New Homepage Launched

Announcing version one of our new homepage.

We’ve given the front page of our site a facelift, with the goal of providing newcomers an easier way of learning about who we are and what we do.

This is version one: Next we’ll be unveiling a new & improved materials catalog and an updated Ponoko showroom.

If you haven’t already, take a moment to check out our new home page. We would love it if you took a moment to share your thoughts. What works? What needs improvement? What are you hoping to see in version two? Let us know in the comments below.

Thanks!

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #6

Business cards with just the key details

When exchanging business cards with someone, what information about you do they really need? In a world where connected devices are within reach at all times, perhaps your most critical info is your online presence.

Gabe Ferreira reduced his key details down to a personal website address and then maxed out the text to fill the area of a traditional business card. In his own words:

“…there is no distinction between content and material. The cards are more durable and cheaper to produce than most “premium” business cards.”

Making use of the Ponoko Personal Factory can give brand identities a strong visual presence and this example from Gabe shows how clever laser cutting will really stand apart from the more familiar printed alternatives. Have you seen other great laser cut business card ideas? Let us know in the comments below.

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Top Ten Ways to Reduce Laser Cutting Costs – Tip #5

Simplify details

We already know that it’s helpful to keep things small in size at the beginning. One key aspect that is often overlooked is to keep details simple as well.

This means sticking to designs that take up as little ‘laser time’ as possible.

So how do you go about optimising your design with this in mind? The short version is that the less time it takes to cut, the less it will cost. You’re paying for every movement the laser cutter makes; whether it is cutting, engraving or travelling between cutting and engraving. Many small detailed forms take longer to trace out than fewer larger forms. Circles take longer than straight lines. Items spread out or are further apart take longer to cut than items located close together.

Dense vector line engraving also comes with the same warning. Remember that with lasers, time really does equal money.

What impact has keeping details simple had on your laser cutting costs? Let us know in the comments below.

The next handy hint focuses on another way to save time, and therefore cost, with your laser cutting. Stay tuned for Tip #6: Avoid Double Lines

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Ponoko Customer Blasts Past Kickstarter Goal in 3 hours

Another Kickstarter success using Ponoko

UPDATE: The Electric Eel Wheel has now raised over $40,928! Huge congrats to Maurice & Emily on reaching over 800% of their goal!

Maurice Ribble is the Boston based engineer behind the Electric Eel Wheel – a clever electric spinning wheel that makes it easy to spin the fiber of your choice into yarn.

Maurice’s Kickstarter campaign blew past it’s $5,000 goal in just three hours – and is on track to break $20,000 in under a week.

The Electric Eel Wheel was already a huge hit in the hobby fiber, spinning, and knitting communities, so it made sense to make the jump to Kickstarter. “I figured this would be a good project for it because nothing like it has been done before” Maurice says, ”my wife who’s been helping with this project really liked the idea of doing a Kickstarter so that’s what really decided it for me.”

Traditionally, yarn is spun with a foot powered spinning wheel – a time consuming process that tends to be hard to master. While there are electric alternatives available, quality wheels are costly- with price tags of $800 or more. This gap in the market was part of the inspiration for the Electric Eel Wheel.

Using laser cut parts from Ponoko, Maurice and his wife Emily set out to create their own electric spinning wheel that was affordable, while still being as good or better than the ones currently on the market.

Maurice says using Ponoko made it easy to reduce costs by iterating through different designs. “I was surprised at how much spending some time optimizing the part layout cut my costs.” he says  ”For me it almost cut my costs by half because I was able to share a lot of edges and use the materials more efficiently.”

While this is the fourth commercially available version of the wheel, Maurice was still able to find ways to improve the design and add new innovative features:

“Once I get my hand on the laser cut Ponoko pieces I assemble it and I almost always get ideas on how I might improve it during assembly. When those improvements are getting small I know I’m at the stage where it’s good enough.”

Maurice credits the research he did, as well as the feedback he got early on as the key to Electric Eel Wheel’s explosive success. “I read a lot about how to launch a Kickstarter campaign. Making a good video is important so I spent a lot of time on that.” Maurice says, “I shared it with a few close friends to build my confidence and get feedback on what I might tweak.”

When we asked Maurice what advice he would give to people just starting out with Kickstarter, he warned entrepreneurs-to-be not to let expansion or addition of new features hurt your project:

“Don’t let feature creep hurt your project. First you need to decide when it’s good enough to put on Kickstarter. Some of the ideas that come in are good and I do leave my options open, but you need to always consider pros and cons before adding something.”

Want to get your hands on your own Electric Eel wheel and start spinning your own yarn? The Electric Eel Wheel is available through Kickstarter at a discounted price, with packages ranging from $149-$209.

Got a great hardware idea of your own? Make and sell it with Ponoko.

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Top Ten Ways to Reduce Laser Cutting Costs – Tip #4


Start small

A great tip for first timers and also just as useful for more experienced makers is to keep things small and simple at the beginning. In short, stick to the Ponoko P1 template. Starting small enables you to test your ideas and be confident before charging ahead with multiple items on larger sheet sizes.

This will keep material costs lower, which is handy not only when experimenting with laser cutting for the first time but also if you are trying out a new material that you haven’t used before.

Make the most of the P1 template size by performing small tests of multiple design ideas. Don’t assume your first attempt will be “The One”. Try multiple cuts, shapes, engravings, etc to see what you like the look of. You are much more likely to end up with a design you are happy with if you remind yourself that it’s not about getting that perfect outcome on the first try.

Keep in mind that with laser cutting, more size or complexity means greater costs. So the smaller dimensions of the P1 template help to constrain the amount of making time, which again means both cutting and material costs will be lower.

What savings have you made by starting small with your laser cutting? Let us know in the details below.

Stay tuned for the next handy piece of advice from the Ponoko team. It’s time to pare things back with Tip #5: Simplify details.

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Laser cut voids

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #218

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut leather top from Julio Alejandro Rodriguez Pozos.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, lace, leaf, cipher, and tape… (more…)

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #5

Laser Cut Pop-Up Chair Card

Giving your clients a quick and easy construction project can be a fun way to ensure your message will be remembered. This effective example of a pop-out chair from seier+seier was produced as a Christmas card and includes straightforward assembly instructions and branding etched onto the remaining material.

As a cute little extra, an additional card featured a bonus pop-out cat to sit on the assembled chair.

Using the Ponoko Personal Factory you too can produce laser cut objects that can easily be transformed from 2d to 3d by the end user. Interactive designs are great way to make a lasting impression. Have you seen other ideas similar to this one? Let us know in the comments below.

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Top Ten Ways to Reduce Laser Cutting Costs – Tip #3

Make a Cardboard Version First

It is an exciting moment when your design is ready to be laser cut, but it can really pay off to do a trial cut in cardboard first before moving ahead with more expensive materials.

Remember, with laser cutting you are paying for the time it takes for the machine to make your design… and cardboard cuts really quickly. This contributes to it being one of the most affordable materials, which means you can get a fast, inexpensive test run of your design. Once you are happy with the cardboard version, you can order your design in a more expensive material with greater confidence that it will come out the way you had hoped.

If your final outcome is to be made from cardboard… well, then kick back and relax because you’re already one step ahead!

Tell us about how trial cuts in cardboard have helped keep your laser cutting costs down in the comments below.

Next up in the Top 10 Ways to Reduce Laser Cutting Costs is a handy bit of advice that is easy to overlook. Tip #4: Start small

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Laser cut Pi(e) fillings

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #217

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut birch Bel-Aire enclosure for Raspberry Pi from The C4 Labs.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, lions, birds, and brass… (more…)

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Guaranteed Order Deadline for Easter

Ensure delivery in time for Easter by ordering before these deadlines.

Easter is an egg-selent time for adorable, spring time projects.

To ensure you receive your product in time for yourself or to gift to someone else, here are your order dates. Keep in mind you’ll save on costs the earlier you order:

Laser Cutting Order Deadlines
Standard Making & Shipping Speeds: Last Orders by Wednesday, March 18th 2015
Upgraded Making & Shipping Speeds: Last Orders by Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

Metal Machining (PCM) Order Deadline
Standard Making & Shipping Speeds: Last Orders by Monday, March 9th 2015.

3D Printing Order Deadline
Standard Making & Shipping Speeds: Last Orders by Friday, March 6th 2015

Happy Easter-Springtime making!

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