Using white wood filler to fill etchings

Making those detailed designs and laser etched text really pop

Laser etched details do often stand out pretty well in their own right, but sometimes it is a good idea to give them a helping hand.

Today we are revisiting an informative post in the Ponoko Support Forums that runs through using white wood filler to bring out the details on wood and plastic laser engraving.

The tutorial focuses on an example laser cut and etched from bamboo. Follow the link and you’ll be taken through the step-by-step process, including important tips such as remembering to clean off the smoke residue from the laser and how to avoid over-sanding in the finishing touches.

This is one way to do it – but we’ve seen people have great results with other techniques as well. Paints are ever-popular; model paints, acrylic paints… in fact paints of all kinds! Others use sharpie markers, crayons, and even glue mixed in with glitter particles.

Read the full tutorial to see if wood filler is the solution for your next laser etched project.

Ponoko Support Forums: White wood filler

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A truly useless end to the year

Closing out the year with a laser cut Useless Machine

If you’re wondering how to make the most of that ever-so-tempting Ponoko Boxing Day discount, here is a completely useless project idea.

How about building your very own laser cut Useless Machine? Thingiverse user Aaron posted this decorative version, along with instructions on how to make your own diabolical contraption. He has even included handy tips on customisation to suit different material thicknesses.

For those who don’t know, a Useless Machine consists of a simple box with a single switch on the top. Upon activating the switch, a hatch opens up and out pops a lever that turns the switch off again.

Originally invented by Artificial Intelligence pioneer Martn Minsky, the Useless Machine is kind of reminiscent of a 19th century novelty mechanical curio. If you do a bit of research you’ll find dozens of examples of how people have had fun with this idea by creating their own variations, and here is a nice video of Martin talking about what he terms the ‘most useless machine ever made’.

As a laser cutting project for both new and experienced makers, this could in fact prove to be quite useful after all.

Thanks to Aaron on Thingiverse.

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Let’s take a closer look at Matte Acrylic

A material that enables your design to shine

When we talk about laser cutting in acrylic, most of the time the focus is on materials with that familiar glossy surface. Today we are taking a closer look at glossy acrylic’s lesser-known (but just as fantastic) cousin, Matte Acrylic.

Available in the Ponoko Materials Library in both black and white options, Matte Acrylic is textured on the top surface, and glossy (like the regular acrylic) on the back. We have a detailed post in the Ponoko Support Forums, which runs through many of the characteristics of this versatile material. Supporting images provide real-world examples and help to clarify whether Matte Acrylic is the right choice for your next laser cutting project.

Learn about how to best make use of this material by combining it with glossy acrylic on larger projects. See examples of the contrast between shiny and matte finishes, and how to use metallic paint to fill laser etched details. There are also a few quirks to discover that you may not have encountered before, and the tutorial includes handy tips and tricks such as advice on removing protective paper.

See more in the full post on Ponoko’s Support Forums.

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Popping up in sharp relief

Butcher knives become a canvas for artist’s message to mankind

Artist Li Hongbo has developed quite a reputation for his remarkable works in paper. The theme of manipulating intricate cutouts continues in cold hard steel with the series “Shadow of Knives”, where he weaves a cautionary tale about our ever-eager consumer society.

“Shadow of Knives” is a warning to society – human beings will eventually destroy themselves because of their gluttony and their abuse of animals.”

As well as the poignant message, these works are an excellent example of the impact that can be achieved using well-planned cutouts from a flat surface.

See more in the series at Contemporary by Angela Li.

via My Amp Goes To 11

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Vector and Raster engraving examples

Free design shows exactly what will happen in your material of choice

The mysteries of how to get the right settings for vector and raster engraving is something that can take time and practise to fully unravel. Thanks to this free file from James Stokebrand, you can create a mini laser etching cheat sheet in your favorite Ponoko material.

The file is set to work perfectly with Ponoko’s P1 template size, and it includes a range of raster fill values, vector line fill values and even some handy tips for designs that use vector linework.

Pictured above is the file etched onto blonde bamboo, and James has also provided high-res sample images in black acrylic and cardstock. Although there is nothing that can truly replace holding a physical sample in your hand, zooming in on these images is pretty close to the next best thing.

Take a look on the Ponoko Support Forums to see for yourself. The file can be downloaded from the Ponoko Showroom, and if it all looks too confusing for you (don’t worry, we all start somewhere!) there is a simpler version of what James has provided all cut and ready to go on the Ponoko Samples page.

via Ponoko Support Forums

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Rope-O’Matic Kickstarter closing soon

Last chance to get your hands on a laser cut rope braiding machine

When we first came across an earlier version of this laser cut mechanical marvel, it had our heads in quite a spin. The 21st century makeover of an 1890’s industrial artefact is a fantastic example of how laser cutting can enable accessibility to broader technological possibilities.

Ever true to his word, David from Mixed Media Engineering has refined the design and launched a Kickstarter campaign for what is now known as the Rope-O’Matic.

With a diverse range of applications it is hardly surprising that this very unique laser cut product has eclipsed its modest campaign funding goal.

Check it out before you miss your chance… don’t tie yourself in knots, there are only a few days left to secure yourself one of these novel devices.

Rope-O’Matic via Kickstarter

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How to etch mirror acrylic

Laser etched impact made easy

As the Festive Season approaches and we become more and more enamoured with all things shiny, here are our tips on how to use laser etching for some serious impact on mirror acrylic.

People love the combination of crisp laser definition with the reflective sheen of mirror acrylic, and to create these effects there are a few key points to remember. The main one is that you’re not etching into the surface of the acrylic, but rather through the reflective coating on the rear of the material.

Another tip that may seem obvious, but you’d be surprised how often it can sneak up on you – remember to reverse the artwork so that it reads correctly when viewed from the other side of the sheet.

For an informative collection of examples including vector and raster engraving, as well as different approaches to filling the etched designs, head over to the Ponoko Support Forums for the full scoop.

Ponoko presents: Laser Etched Mirror Acrylic

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Laser Cut Portable Chair

Put your tired legs up and relax in style

For Kyoto Institute of Technology student Ryo Kosaka, every leisurely bike ride should finish up with a relaxing cup of coffee. And what better way to put your feet up, than to bring along your own portable chair?

The laser cut plywood chair disassembles, with all the structural elements – including a bonus side table – neatly tucking away inside the seating surface for storage on a bike. Assembly instructions are etched onto the underside, making it quick and easy to pop together when you need to rest your legs and take in the view.

Click through for a neat little clip of the chair components being laser cut, and then put to good use out in the countryside.   (more…)

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How to make a laser cut greeting card

Send your loved ones a card they will genuinely cherish

The pleasure of giving a custom greeting card is something many of us lose touch with beyond our pre-school years, but it needn’t be that way and Ponoko is here to help mark those special moments.

This informative post from the Ponoko Support Forums walks through two examples of laser cut greeting cards, and adds further inspiration on ways to make the most of the cost effective (and also quite versatile) options for laser cut card in the Ponoko Materials Library.

With Ponoko’s last-chance holiday deadline almost upon us, there is still enough time to dazzle your loved ones with a laser cut masterpiece.

Remember the all-important first step of doing some ‘free prototyping’ at home by printing your design out at 1:1 scale. If it all looks right, then fire up your Personal Factory and send through a file for laser cutting before it’s too late!

via Ponoko Support Forums: How To Make A Laser Cut Greeting Card

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Laser Etched Thanksgiving

Pumpkin pie becomes a tasty canvas for the Holidays

Bringing back a little history to the Thanksgiving celebration table, the guys at Quirky used their festive pumpkin pie as a canvas for a laser etched replica of the Mayflower.

“This Thanksgiving, we’re thankful for pumpkin pie. We’re also thankful for the laser-cutting machine we used to burn the image of the Mayflower into our pumpkin pie.”

It’s educational, it’s artistic, and we assume it was also delicious.

For those of us who don’t have a laser cutter in the kitchen, consider this other option that can create a similar outcome. Fire up your Ponoko Personal Factory to laser cut a holiday-themed design from cardstock or acrylic, then use it as a stencil. Sprinkle over some sugar, chocolate, or perhaps sesame seeds to turn your own pie into a conversation piece that your guests will remember for more than just its flavor.

via Gizmodo

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