The Deconstruction event

Makers keep this coming weekend free!

The Deconstruction is an open global event and runs from February 22 to the 24th, starting at 8PM PST. Teams of makers, artists, students, programmers, problem-solvers, designers, performers, filmmakers, etc are invited to register and deconstruct the world around us.

Being an experimental event, the premise is very open and there is no topic given, although some broad challenge criteria will be released during the event.

“The goal of The Deconstruction is to bring people together from all over the world (physically and digitally) to share ideas, collaborate, create, innovate, and most imporantly have fun. The event is open to anyone, anywhere, of any age and skill level.” (more…)

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Multi-colour prints from a single extruder

Tutorial shows how to liven up your 3D prints

Are you finding the monochromatic output of your 3D printer a little drab? According to Andre Tiemann, coloured prints are easily achievable and he has written up a neat tutorial explaining how to achieve multiple hues… and you don’t even need to have the latest high-tech equipment.

With dual-head extruders becoming more and more commonplace, coloured prints may not seem so exceptional – but what sets Andre’s efforts apart is that he is producing multiple colours from a single extruder.

Referring to the prints as 2.5D (rather than full-blown 3D objects), he explains the process of colour swapping based on layer height to radically change the appearance of the printed object.

“…while this isn’t a breakthrough in 3D printing, it is a fun technique to liven up prints.”

Instructables via 3Ders

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Help Wellington Makerspace raise money for Mobile Maker Van

$2500 needed to equip makerspace on wheels

Since the Wellington Makerspace opened last June in Wellington, New Zealand, it has quickly become a hub of diverse creativity, bespoke manufacture, and educational outreach.

From access to equipment such as a laser cutter and CNC router and workshops ranging from bee keeping to DIY surveillance devices, there’s a full roster of member benefits and events. The makerspace also provides dedicated workspace for personal projects and hosts a regular “Mini Maker” for kids.

The team behind the makerspace wants to bring these opportunities to those outside central Wellington, especially at-risk youth and teens. To do this, they are raising $2500 through PledgeMe to equip a Mobile Maker Van.

They’ve already got the fabrication tools but still need help to purchase 12 laptops. The pledge has 2 weeks left and is a only $200 away from the goal.

Donations rewards include a makerspace party invite for $10, a free laser-cutting workshop for $40, your face 3D printed for $175, plus larger corporate sponsorship packets. You can pitch in at PledgeMe.

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Game of Thrones fan prints 3D Winterfell

Leaping from the small screen: Printer is coming

Fans will go a long way to bring their favorite shows to life, especially during the long, cold Winter that separates viewing seasons. Game of Thrones fan Daniel Ammann has brought forth the town of Winterfell from the small screen with this faithful 3D printed replica.

With only a few seconds of footage from the opening credits to go by, Daniel also turned to fanart and information on the Wiki of Fire and Ice (a resource based on the novels that inspired the TV series).

The model of the town was made in Solidworks, and the files have been shared on Thingiverse where they are gathering quite a following.       (more…)

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Making a bioprinter from an old inkjet

Welcome to the early days of DIY biofabbing.

Instructables user Patrik has put together a guide for making a simple bioprinter out of and old inkjet print and a couple old CD drives. He has successfully printed bioluminescent E. coli in the form of readable text (image after the jump). Bioprinting is still largely in the research stages for medical and industrial purposes, but DIY enthusiasts are close behind.
(more…)

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Filabot winds toward closed loop recycling

Filament making machine winds its way toward finishing its Kickstarter campaign rewards

Filabot ReclaimerWe last looked at Filabot, the plastic extrusion filament maker for Makerbot and RepRap style 3D printers when Tyler McNaney was in the middle of his Kickstarter Campaign, that ended up successfully raising $32,330 and was more than 320% funded.

The Filabot is a desktop machine that aims to help reduce the cost of 3D printing for filament based and reduce plastic waste by turning it into “ink” or filament for 3D printers that print by depositing and fusing plastic together.

The Filabot Reclaimer has recently had a lot of development work from McNaney, whose working hard to fulfil his Kickstarter rewards orders by the end of the year. He, recently revealed the design for the production Filabot Reclaimer on his website. The case is made from folded CNC plasma cut steel. (more…)

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Kickstarting a landmine detonator

Mine Kafon: a low cost, wind powered mine detonator

Of all the maker projects I saw in 2012, Massoud Hassani’s Mine Kafon stands out in my mind as the most valuable contribution to global society.  Hassani grew up in Qasaba, Kabul in Afghanistan, he is now an industrial designer living in Eindhoven in the Netherlands. In his studies at university, Hassani recognised that the current means of land mine removal hasn’t had a lot of development in the last 60 years, it is still a labourous, dangerous, slow and expensive operation.  Mine Kafon is designed as a low cost solution to the problem of old, but still active, land mines. It is a land mine detonator inspired in part by childhood toys that Hassani and his friends crafted from cheap materials. (more…)

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Circuit Playground teaches kids about electronics

Web series uses puppets to inspire the next generation of inventors


Adafruit continues in their quest to make DIY electronics easy for all ages with Circuit Playground, a children’s web series that teaches electronics in a quirky and fun way.

“We’ll have each component have a story, a song and something to do”

From Cappy the Capacitor to Hans the 555 Timer Chip, this light-hearted approach will enable enquiring youngsters to immerse themselves in technology as they gain valuable real-world knowledge.

Supporting the show there are additional fun low-tech teaching aids including a colouring book and a set of plush dolls that will bring the characters to life. Combine this with the Circuit Playground iOS app and you’ve got plenty to not only keep the kids entertained and engaged with the learning process, but also maintain the underlying goal of inspiring the next generation of engineers.

“We want to celebrate the fun and good parts of making things, and even tackle complex subjects like what’s ‘good’ to make”

Circuit Playground is scheduled to air in March on Google+ and Ustream.

via Wired

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The King of CNC heading to a printer near you

Indiegogo campaign spreads the word about DIY digital manufacturing

What exactly does it take to be crowned the king of CNC? Amongst those jostling for Regal top honors is the prolific and wildly enthusiastic Jon Cantin, a fellow you may recall as the guy behind WoodMarvels, now known as CNCKing.com.

Jon has launched an Indiegogo campaign to help make Volume 4 of his CNC book series available to a wider audience. It draws on many years of experience making children’s toys using the distributed manufacturing models offered by companies such as Ponoko.

This book contains all the knowledge I wish I had access to all those years back… if you want to learn how to design using a CNC table router or laser cutter, you must add this book to your library!

Beyond selling a few books, a broader goal of the campaign is to encourage more kids and educators to embrace the potential that CNC machines have to change peoples’ lives. Jon imagines a day when children ask Santa for a CNC machine so that they can build their own toys.

Learn more about the campaign and pledge your support at Indiegogo.

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Self taught teen from Sierra Leone invited to MIT Media Lab

Youngest visiting practitioner at 16 years old runs a radio station he built himself
At 16 years of age, Kelvin Doe or DJ Focus is the youngest person ever to be invited to MIT Media Lab as a Visiting Practitioner. Even more remarkable is that Doe lives in Sierra Leone, an African nation on the path to recovery from civil war, and he’s already an accomplished, self taught maker. Prior to his visit, he had never traveled more than 10 miles from his town.
Doe was given the opportunity to spend three weeks at MIT as part of their International Development Initiative program, after becoming a finalist in Innovate Salone. Innovate Salone’s a contest started by fellow Sierra Leone local and PhD candidate at MIT David Sengeh to challenge and stimulate young people to solve many of the complex issues of their country which has recently emerged from a decade long civil conflict. (more…)

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