What’s in a name laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #181

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut acrylic octopus necklace from C.A.B. fayre.

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After the jump, teeth, boxes, and Nomi! (more…)

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Rolling out the laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #180

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut rolling pins from Zuzia Kozerska. Thanks to Mathew Messner for the submission and image courtesy of This Is Colossal.

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After the jump, bowls, arcs, hearts, and YouFab is back! (more…)

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Laser Cut Mitre Joints

Connecting planes with angled precision

Running interesting laser cutter experiments is one of the things that Just Add Sharks does best. In this exploration, they have addressed the question of how to break away from the mortice and tenon joints that have become so familiar in laser cut projects.

By creating a laser cut jig that holds the material at a specific angle, they were able to cut edges that can fit together in a manner that is clean and precise. No more stepped blocks and slots! Here is what the jig looks like:

Much easier to achieve than modifying the axis of the laser cutter itself, this jig provides a firm support to a pre-cut panel, and does not require any other machine modifications. The angle of the cut can be controlled by altering the vertical supports.

“Manually changing the angles like this is tiresome so the next sensible upgrade would be to build an ‘any angle, any material thickness’ jig for the same purpose, but that is a job for another day.”

The Just Add Sharks blog has an overview by Martin Raynsford that talks through a few of the considerations that led to the first successful cut. Having proven that it can be done with standard perpendicular joints, they adjusted a few specs on the jig to produce a icosahedron, pictured below.

via Just Add Sharks

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Laser cut flower power

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #179

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut and etched African Padau wood lotus necklace from Shadow Fox Design.

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After the jump, flowers, feathers, fingers, and a clock… (more…)

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Laser cut light

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #178

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut MDF lamp from Baraboda.

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After the jump, a wolf, a purse, a tree, and lanters… (more…)

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Laser cut protection

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #177

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut and etched adler wood coasters from A Fluttered Collection.

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After the jump, razor blades, diamonds, a tree, and Africa… (more…)

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Positive (and negative) laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #176

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut Baltic birch plywood clock from Sarah Mimo Clocks.

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After the jump, unicorns, teardrops, trivets, and earrings… (more…)

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Laser cutting is in the bag

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #175

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut wood clutch from Amy Davidson Bags.

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After the jump, cowboys, Sith, earrings, and leaves… (more…)

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Laser cut mechanical Moon Phase Clock

Tracking the lunar orbit with laser cut precision

For those who need to know the phases of the moon, there are options way more satisfying than turning to your favourite Internet search engine.

This laser cut marvel was produced by Lukas Christensen as a gift for his brother, a biodynamic farmer who relies on Moon phases to plant and harvest crops.

When investigating exactly what to make, Lukas decided that merely tracking phases of the Moon would be far too easy. To add an extra challenge, he incorporated the function of showing rise and set times of the Moon. And so the Moon Machine began to take form.

Clearly no stranger to working with numbers, Lukas has included a thorough walkthrough of his process on Instructables.

Although an actual video would have been great to see, here is the next best thing – an animation of the mechanism where you can see the hand crank turning away. In real-world use, one turn of the crank is made each day.

Some of the wooden gears broke under the considerable pressure of the assembled machine at the point where forces are translated to the central planetary gear. To get around this, substitute parts were cut from aluminium.

Reflecting on the completed Moon Phase machine, Lukas has identified a number of ways to make it even more accurate should he come to attempt another version.

Learn more about Moon Machine on Instructables.

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Laser cut for mom

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #174

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are Laser cut and printed wood robots from Indie Laser.

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After the jump, penguins, horses, and pop-outs… (more…)

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