Laser Cutting In Her Eyes

Laser cut art, Daleks, dogs, hops, and clock!

Above is an artwork titled “Rusty Girl” from perishable Rush. It is made from paper found on the streets of Amsterdam, comic book, magazine pages, and torn screen prints which form a ski mask around laser etched, halftone eyes and a mouth. Halftone is a printing technique that using variant sized dots to create light and shade out of photographs and is well suited to laser raster engraving on Ponoko’s own cardstock or mix it up with acrylic.

After the jump, Daleks, dogs, hops, and clock… (more…)

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Laser Cutting – It’s Like A Unicorn Wearing Roller Skates

A laser cut unicorn, a phone dock, an Astro Boy lamp, and a mother’s day card!

Above is a laser cut and etched wood floss organizer of Rasalie Gale’s iconic unicorn (on roller skates) design – here with the floss making its colorful mane. It was made by 6 By 6 Arts.  It was made using 1/4″ plywood like Ponoko’s own Veneer MDF – Cherry which allows for smooth cut edges and clean Raster Engraving.

After the jump, a phone dock, an Astro Boy lamp, and a mother’s day card…

(more…)

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Laser Cut Letter Stamps

Watch this designer font break free from the digital world

Amongst other things, Tyler Finck designs fonts… and quite beautiful ones at that. Looking for an interesting way to take his digital typography a little further, the font Upstater Regular was selected to be transformed into stamp blocks using a laser cutter.

While we don’t get to see what the stamps will actually be used for, Tyler has posted a neat little clip of the laser cutter in action. The whole character set took 25 minutes to cut and etch, leaving him with a collection of miniature stamps that can now go on to create analogue artworks or literary masterpieces… or perhaps just compose the words for short personal messages; sending sweet nothings in a way that inkjet printers can only dream of.

via Tyler Finck on YouTube

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How to: Turn a Logo into a Laser Cut Item

Achieving low cost, high quality results quickly and easily

Starting your own line of products can be a challenge, particularly if you’re competing against companies with established backgrounds in manufacturing. By using the Ponoko Personal Factory, you can achieve a refined, professional result with surprising ease.

The following tutorial walks through the process of adding a laser cut logo to a series of products, from the initial napkin scribbles all the way to a final outcome that can stand proud amongst all the other shiny products in the front window of a store.

The project we are looking at is a logo for a custom line of amplifiers. The client requested a finish that would match the mid-century styling of the product casing, keeping things looking modern while retaining a connection to the classic rocker feel of the product line.   (more…)

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Laser cutting, clearly…

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #225

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut see through birdhouse designed by Joe Mansfield of engrave.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, cheese, a cathedral, and a girl… (more…)

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Laser Cut GrannyMan Puppet

Colorful threads complete whimsical animated character

Combining rigid laser cut forms with softer materials can have quite a striking effect, as you can see in this cycling puppet designed for a short film by Teje la Araña.

Colored yarn has been threaded through the laser cut pin holes, completing the form in a way that really enhances the playful feel of the character. You can check out a brief clip of Alvaro Leon’s puppet, and even download files to make a threaded cyclist of your very own from Thingiverse.

Let us know in the comments below if you’ve done something interesting by combining laser cutting with fabric or yarn.

via Thingiverse.

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Industrial Designer Iterates From Idea To Market in Just 15 Days.

Industrial designer Delna Balsara teams up with Ponoko to quickly bring her product idea to life.

Delna Balsara is the industrial designer behind BUKUL – a clever bamboo organizer that keeps your pens, notebooks, phone and tablet organized while you’re on the go.

Made from laser cut bamboo from Ponoko – the BUKUL comes with 2 elastic belts, one for securing your pens and phone to a notebook, and a larger belt for connecting the BUKUL to your laptop.

Delna got the idea while at work, going from meeting room to meeting room juggling her belongings in her hands. “Sometimes it was embarrassing” she says “It wasn’t enough to warrant carrying my backpack everywhere, but I kept dropping things.” A friend recommend she try out Ponoko, so she signed up and set to work on creating a solution for herself.

Delna was impressed with how quickly she was able to go from idea to prototype. “I drew it out in Illustrator and uploaded it to Ponoko – super easy.” she ways “I had it within a week”. Delna then set to work on hand-sewing the first set of elastic straps, and checking the measurements of her new invention.

The quick turnaround time meant she was able to quickly revise and update her product in days, rather than weeks. “The measurements were still a bit off for my phone and pen to properly fit” Delna says “so I revised my file and uploaded it to Ponoko. Once again, it was sent in no time and my first BUKUL was made.”

With a working final product in her hard, the BUKUL soon caught the eye of her co-workers. “Every meeting I went to, colleagues wanted to know where I bought it.” she says. It was clear that folks were looking for a way to keep organized when they walk into a meeting, studio or class. “Everyone was urging me to sell them on ETSY” she says “so I finally bit-the-bullet and set up a store.”

Delna points out Ponoko’s speedy customer service made it easy to iterate from idea to final product:

“I love the ease of uploading my files, the production statuses that I get, but most of all it’s the customer service. Anytime I’ve had an issue or question about a file, someone gets back to me right away and is really helpful. I think there’s just an overall ease to the process, from beginning to end.”

Delna’s story is another great example of how you can go from idea to final product faster than ever before with Ponoko.

The BUKL is available on Delna’s ETSY store.

Inspired to design your own product line? Make it with Ponoko!

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The silence of laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #224

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut acrylic deaths head moth hair clips from Curiology Gallery.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, big foot, honeycomb, suburbs, and metatron… (more…)

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How far into the material does laser engraving cut?

All you need to know about laser etched depth

When your design calls for laser etching, whether it is Line Engraving or Area Fill Engraving, the laser burns away a very small amount of material – just enough to make an impression on the surface. The lasers are calibrated to provide a crisp contrasting visual effect, rather than a guaranteed depth. But if you still want to know how deep laser engraving goes, we can take a closer look and also talk about a few alternatives for when your design requires a greater depth than laser engraving can achieve.

How deep does the laser cut?

This varies from material to material, but it is always just a surface impression. In 3mm acrylic you can expect around 0.25mm (0.01″) deep, and in some of the woods the laser will cut up to 0.5mm (0.02″) deep. To go further into the material than this will increase the risk of undesirable damage such as warping (in acrylic) and excessive burning (in timber).

In certain circumstances it can be difficult to predict exactly how laser engraved lines or areas will come out, as we can see in the sample images. Note how the very small Area Engraved text is patchy and even has some elements missing. Here is what Josh has to say in the Ponoko Support Forums:

One thing you can do to improve the quality of the engraving is put a vector engraving line around your text or shapes to make the edges more crisp. There are pros and cons for using this technique and it largely depends on which material you are using. Personally I like a heavy raster engraving on any of the plastics but a medium raster engraving with a medium vector outline on the timbers.

With this in mind, we recommend experimenting with different settings on a test piece (the P1 template is handy for this!) before going ahead with the final design. You can also learn a lot by checking out the Material Samples, and this very handy Laser Engraving Cheat Sheet.

The Ponoko Support Forums are a great resource when it comes to learning all about laser cutting, and you’ll find guides on both line engraving and area engraving complete with sample images in a range of materials and tips on how to get the best results.

What if I want to go deeper than this?

Laser engraving is not always the way to go… some designs call for a larger amount of material to be removed than laser engraving can provide. Depending on your requirements, there are a number of ways to achieve this. Two of the most common solutions are:

1. Use a secondary process to remove the material (for example, cutting a strip halfway through the material using a milling machine or table saw). This is not a part of the Ponoko service, and would need to be done in your own workshop or maker space.

2. Build up the structure from several layers of material. Control the depth of cavities and cutouts by placing a solid layer on the bottom and then reducing the size of subsequent layers to create the required change in depth. This can be easily achieved with laser cutting and is often used to make enclosures for electronics in acrylics from the Ponoko Materials Catalog.

What has your experience been using different laser engraving settings? Let us know in the comments below.

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Laser cut skulls

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #223

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a paper craft skull from Cardboard Sarfari.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page – we just reached 1000 likes!

After the jump, another skull, a birdhouse, Mickey, and a ukulele… (more…)

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