Laser cut girls, girls, girls

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #216

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut and etched cherry wood embroidery floss holders from Pie For Blackbirds.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, clocks, lamps, girls, and lips… (more…)

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Laser Cut Tie Fighter and X-Wing

Watching them take shape

Lasers and Star Wars go together like movies and popcorn, so it makes perfect sense to laser cut some Star Wars model fighters. Simon Green used these Thingiverse files to cut a model X-Wing and Tie Fighter from 3mm plywood. Watch the video above to see the laser cutter in action. Red Leader standing by…

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How To Make Glue-less Interlocking Parts

Using the SketchUp plugin SliceModeler for the best friction fit

There are several ways to create 3D shapes from flat laser cut material, and each have their merits. Many Ponoko users ask questions about how to best design for interlocking parts – making this one of the more popular choices for transforming laser cut forms into 3D objects.

Interlocking parts can be mechanically fastened together, but in this tutorial we are looking at how to design friction-fit connections that neatly snap and lock into place.

Pictured above is a laser cut trivet made by Ponoko user Andrew Jones. To produce this form he used the freely available software SketchUp along with the handy SliceModeler plugin. He then compiled a detailed Instructables walkthrough that outlines his design process for interlocking laser cut products.

To achieve the glue-less design, small curved bumps (nodes) are added into each slot. This extra material allows the parts to slide together with enough contact and pressure to fit snugly. This sounds easy enough, but just how to get the right size and number of nodes takes some time and patience. Slot length, material thickness and density are just a few of the factors that need to be considered.

I highly recommend creating parts with different size and numbers of nodes so you can find the best fit that works for you. You might want a very hard fit that needs to be tapped together with a rubber mallet or you might want a fit that can be assembled by hand without any tools. The only way to find the fit that works for you is try different size nodes.

Click through to the full tutorial where you will learn how to create a basic form using Sketchup and SliceModeler, add the nodes, export into Inkscape and then add the final SVG to a Ponoko template ready for laser cutting.

via Andrew Jones on Instructables

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Inside laser cut animals

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #215

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut corrugated cardboard bear from Cardboard Safari.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, sharks, cuffs, clips, and a crop… (more…)

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Laser cutting city limits

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #214

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut aluminum Frederick Spires Cityscape from Shield Co.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, hearts, dinosaurs, and a table… (more…)

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Comparing Stains on Laser Cut Wood

How to add a little something extra after all the cutting has been done

With all of the different material options available for laser cutting, it may seem like you are spoiled for choice. But sometimes it is nice to have a little more control over your finished outcome, and that’s were oils and wood stains can do wonders to transform the look of a material.

In this handy test-run and resulting visual comparison, Josh has taken a look at some of the popular Ponoko materials and how they perform with different finishes.

As well as putting together the table pictured above, he has noted down a few handy tips and material highlights that will help you make the right choice for your own laser cutting. Read on in the Ponoko Support Forums and learn how you can get the best possible outcome with stains and finishes on laser cut wood.

This content originally appeared in the Ponoko Support Forums.

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #3

Laser cut & engraved stamp

The tactile satisfaction of a physical stamp can help give your brand a memorable impact. The example above includes a simple but cleverly designed laser cut ergonomic handle which also has several surfaces where further branding or information can be laser etched.

Whether a laser etched stamp is produced as a promotional item to be given away, or as a tool to apply branding onto media for prospective customers, there is a novel human element to it that can communicate at a deeper level than conventional printed materials.

Creative modern interpretations of seemingly superseded technologies are a great way to make use of the Ponoko Personal Factory. Don’t see laser-safe natural rubber in the Materials Catalog? Make a request here, and your wish is our command…

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Laser Cut Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

Capturing the breeze for DIY power generation

This work-in-progress from Auckland-based scientist Dr Chris Pook looks to be moving along quite nicely. The aerofoils are still being refined, but even in their current state they are able to catch enough breeze to begin generating power.

I’m really pleased with how much of this turned out. The frame, the spindle and the arms all look just like the CAD design.

To see the thorough walkthrough of Dr Chris’ design process, follow his thoughts and progress here. This is a great example of how laser cutting can be used to generate progressive iterations of a design, continually refining towards a highly optimised final outcome.

via Dr Chris Pook

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Look at laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #212

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut necklace from The Fashion Bandits.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, glasses, fruit, trees, a house, and arrows… (more…)

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How to transform an existing product

IKEA product hacking gets a facelift with some custom laser cutting

stairlight2.jpg

Mass produced commercial products can make a fantastic base for custom laser cut additions. This IKEA wall fixture hack by Josh Reuss was originally posted in the Ponoko Support forums Show & Tell section, and provides a nicely resolved example of how laser cutting can be used to transform an existing product.

There is more to this than simply cutting out a shape that slips over the manufactured fitting. Josh came up with some clever ways to create the full sized panel from several smaller components, while keeping all joints concealed and obscured by the pattern details.

Follow the link for a thorough walkthrough of the process that saw an off-the-shelf product become a unique, eye-catching designer item with surprising ease. (more…)

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