A sense for laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #188

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut perforated paper take-off light lampshades which allow you to make any pattern or opacity you want from fifti-fifti.

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After the jump, foam, hedgehogs, skulls, and friends… (more…)

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Introducing laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #186

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut and etched wood dog tag from Cropscotch.

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After the jump, diamonds, geraniums, dears, and chain… (more…)

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Photochemical Machining Goes Bohemian

Digital fabrication meets ancient jewelry making techniques

Rachel Dropp is the one-woman operation behind Raw Elements Jewelry, a brand that combines modern Photochemical Machining (PCM) with traditional jewelry-making techniques. The results are unique hand-crafted pieces that feature a raw, unique style.

The pieces in the Raw Elements Jewelry line drawn inspirations everywhere from French needle point lace to the phases of the moon.

“While creating new collections I adhere to 3 aesthetic themes: rustic nature, bohemian and sacred geometry.”

The pieces are designed by Dropp, who then hammers, polishes, patinas and does the final soldering to arrive at her finished product. “I love incorporating all of the processes” Dropp says, “because it keeps things interesting and it allows me to have a great mix of products to offer to my customers.”

As someone who enjoys working on the creative side, Rachel initially found it difficult to jump into sales. “I’ve had to step outside my comfort zone” Dropp says “to call boutiques that I feel would be interested in selling my wares and to make appointments”.

Stepping out of her comfort zone has paid off for Dropp, who’s jewelry is now available online on her website and Etsy store as well as in boutiques everywhere from Sonoma County to the San Francisco Bay area

I asked Rachel what was on the horizon for Raw Elements Jewelry. “Coming up in August, I will be attending the Bodega Bay Seafood Art and Wine Festival and then in the beginning of September I will have a booth at Bhakti Fest in Southern California. I also plan to launch a new collection of mini sacred geometry charm necklaces.”

You can purchase Raw Elements Jewelry online at rawelementsjewelry.com or at any of the stores and boutiques listed on her site.

Inspired to design your own product line? Make it with Ponoko!

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Laser cut divinity

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #184

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut silver earrings from Chrysalism.

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After the jump, crows, flowers, corners, and free hugs… (more…)

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What’s in a name laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #181

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut acrylic octopus necklace from C.A.B. fayre.

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After the jump, teeth, boxes, and Nomi! (more…)

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Laser cut flower power

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #179

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut and etched African Padau wood lotus necklace from Shadow Fox Design.

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After the jump, flowers, feathers, fingers, and a clock… (more…)

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Laser cut for mom

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #174

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are Laser cut and printed wood robots from Indie Laser.

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After the jump, penguins, horses, and pop-outs… (more…)

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Awesome Laser Cut Robots That Fit in Your Pocket

Ponoko-made pocket sized robots by Junichi Tsuneoka.

Junichi Tsuneoka is the illustrator and designer behind CHIBIPOCKET – collectable laser cut robot toys that combine traditional woodworking techniques with digital laser fabrication.

Junichi has been a graphic designer since 2002, creating vibrant character-driven illustrations for his company Stubborn Sideburn. In 2012, he was inspired to jump into making three dimensional art when one of his clients hired him to design their vinyl toys:

“When I first got the sample I really liked the idea of my design becoming a 3D form. I had been doing only flat print projects till then so it was very refreshing for me. I wanted to do more 3D projects to expand my design possibilities.”

Junichi experimented with several production methods ranging from soft vinyl, plastic mold and 3D printing before landing on laser wood cutting. “It’s very close to how I usually design graphics and print digitally” he explains, “yet there is a bit of crafting quality.”

His first robot figurine was meant to be more of a personal project rather than a product line, but after showing it around it became clear there was a lot of interest in the idea. “I got a lot of good feedback plus I really enjoyed making it,” he says, “so I decided to expand the project.”

Junichi used his Personal Factory to instantly price lots of design iterations while expanding his new product line:

“It’s very handy that you can see the price right away when you upload the file” he said, “it gives me a chance to modify the file so I can control the price really easily.”

By digitally prototyping with in this way, Junichi was able to control costs early so he could stay competitive at the retail level later on.

CHIBIPOCKET was inspired by the types of toys Junichi grew up carrying around in his pocket. ‘Chibi’ is a Japanese term for ‘short person’ or ‘small child’. In popular culture, chibi has mostly referred to characters with oversized heads and small bodies – similar to babies – to emphasize cuteness and child-like spirit. “My original concept of the whole product line is about my childhood memory.” he says, “So I decided to do pocketable art/toys.”

When I asked what initially drew him to Ponoko, Junichi explained that speed is key:

“When I work with individual laser cut service, I had to spend quite a bit of time giving instructions for custom jobs and communicating back and forth.” he explains. “That would cause errors and a lot of extra time to spend. I don’t have to experience that with Ponoko.”

Each figurine combines several pieces of laser cut bamboo and fluorescent acrylic, which is then hand-sanded and finished with Sumi Ink to bring the characters to life.

What’s on the horizon for Junichi? CHIBIPOCKET was recently commissioned by totem resolve to make all the 10 Wu Tang Clan members into handmade bamboo toys:


Left to right: GZA, RZA, UGOD, Cappa Donna & Ghost Face

Junichi’s robots are available at CHIBIPOCKET.

Inspired to create your own product line? Make it with Ponoko!

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Laser cut filigee

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #162

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

Above are laser cut leather nautilus earrings from Kristina Banwell Designs.

After the jump, masks, gears, chairs, pirate ships, owls (kind of), and relaxation… (more…)

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The Kelpies: Giant laser cut horse sculptures

Towering over the Scottish landscape

Here is a treat for lovers of laser cutting on a grand scale. Celebrating the horse-powered heritage of Scotland, Andy Scott’s The Kelpies is a monument to both the past and the future.

Representing two dynamic Clydesdale horse heads rearing up from the landscape, this colossal laser cut sculpture is nearing completion after 7 years of development. It has taken some serious engineering to pull the project together, and the results will be awe-inspiring for visitors to the site when it opens in 2014.

Continue reading for more info and images of the construction process, engineering and design development.   (more…)

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