What’s in a name laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #181

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut acrylic octopus necklace from C.A.B. fayre.

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After the jump, teeth, boxes, and Nomi! (more…)

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Rolling out the laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #180

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut rolling pins from Zuzia Kozerska. Thanks to Mathew Messner for the submission and image courtesy of This Is Colossal.

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After the jump, bowls, arcs, hearts, and YouFab is back! (more…)

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Laser Cut Mitre Joints

Connecting planes with angled precision

Running interesting laser cutter experiments is one of the things that Just Add Sharks does best. In this exploration, they have addressed the question of how to break away from the mortice and tenon joints that have become so familiar in laser cut projects.

By creating a laser cut jig that holds the material at a specific angle, they were able to cut edges that can fit together in a manner that is clean and precise. No more stepped blocks and slots! Here is what the jig looks like:

Much easier to achieve than modifying the axis of the laser cutter itself, this jig provides a firm support to a pre-cut panel, and does not require any other machine modifications. The angle of the cut can be controlled by altering the vertical supports.

“Manually changing the angles like this is tiresome so the next sensible upgrade would be to build an ‘any angle, any material thickness’ jig for the same purpose, but that is a job for another day.”

The Just Add Sharks blog has an overview by Martin Raynsford that talks through a few of the considerations that led to the first successful cut. Having proven that it can be done with standard perpendicular joints, they adjusted a few specs on the jig to produce a icosahedron, pictured below.

via Just Add Sharks

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Laser cut flower power

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #179

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut and etched African Padau wood lotus necklace from Shadow Fox Design.

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After the jump, flowers, feathers, fingers, and a clock… (more…)

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Laser cut protection

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #177

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut and etched adler wood coasters from A Fluttered Collection.

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After the jump, razor blades, diamonds, a tree, and Africa… (more…)

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Laser cutting is in the bag

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #175

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut wood clutch from Amy Davidson Bags.

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After the jump, cowboys, Sith, earrings, and leaves… (more…)

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Laser cut play

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #173

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Laser cut Garland doll house from Wood Victorian Dollhouse.

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After the jump, props, feathers, spirals, breakfast, and hearts… (more…)

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Laser cut old things

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #172

Above is a Gothic Architecture Wood Lamp from 1 Man 1 Garage.

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

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After the jump, dinosaurs, curls, and kickstarters… (more…)

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Laser cut cops and robbers

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #171

Above are two laser cut birch owl clocks from Pedromealha.

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

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After the jump, lips, collars, queens, and guns… (more…)

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Open Source Laser Cut CT Scanner

Taking a DIY approach to high tech imaging

Providing the magical ability to scan not only the surface, but also to reveal details of the insides of an object, the CT (computed tomography) scanner has quite literally changed the way we see ourselves.

Modern CT scanners are frightfully expensive and are usually found in hospitals but Canadian-born Peter Jansen has built one himself out of laser cut wood.

“After seeing the cost for my CT scan, I decided it was time to try to build an open source desktop CT scanner for small objects, and to do it for much less than the cost of a single scan.”

With a design quite similar to the early commercial CT scanners, Peter’s device began as a quarter-scale laser cut acrylic version that he whipped up in a single day.

He then used this mockup to help refine the design, under the watchful gaze of a friendly house cat. (more…)

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