Get it in laser cut gear

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #197

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut birch plywood magnetic gear toy from Steven Mattern Design.

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After the jump, crosses, keys, and cuffs… (more…)

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A heady mix of laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #196

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser etched wood rolling pins (for Play Dough) from Humble Elephant.

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After the jump, bunnies, ghosts, Afros, chapels, and ice cream… (more…)

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Laser cut dogs and cats

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #195

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut wood pet portrait from Jodi Lynn’s Emporium of Doodles.

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After the jump, cats, skulls, and kicks… (more…)

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Laser cut plagues

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #194

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut acrylic bottle stoppers from B Goods.

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After the jump, germs, ravens buttons, and other birds… (more…)

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Laser cut shared interests

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #193

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut birch wood coaster from Green Wood LT.

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After the jump, buttons, ties, flowers, and sentiments… (more…)

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Laser cut vacations

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #192

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut and etched wood coasters from C+M Designs.

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After the jump, ships in bottles, owls and pussycats, bears, posters, and escapes… (more…)

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Owl you need to know about laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #191

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut and etched leather owl bracelet from Dymond Designs.

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After the jump, tubes, lagoons, and guest books… (more…)

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Laser Cut Helical Springs

Coils that run rings around Slinky

Thanks to the addition of a rotary attachment for his laser cutter, Adam Watters has spent several months exploring what happens when you cut helical paths onto cylinders.

The variety of outcomes shows that there is a whole lot further to go with Springs than the trusty old Slinky would have us believe. Working in materials including acrylic, cardboard and 3d printed PLA, he has created a range of forms that have a mathematical beauty both as static objects and when in motion.

Discovering new patterns and the shapes and forms that follow has been a rewarding process for Adam. When questioned as to what the point of it all is, he had this to say:

For a little while, I turned my attention to finding an application for these, but that proved to be way less fun than experimenting with the process and cutting new springs. So for now, they are what they are.

Head over to Instructables where you can read all about laser cutting acrylic and cardboard springs, from a straightforward spiral through to cuboid grids, nested coils and even compression springs that take things in another direction entirely.

via Instructables: Laser Cut Helical Springs

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Laser Cut Turbine Whistle

Shrinking an air-raid siren to fit into your pocket

Quoted as being ideally suited for those looking to be really annoying, this laser cut project by Mark Langford on Instructables might catch your attention. Taking the same principles that give air-raid sirens such an impressive audio impact, he has condensed them down into a neat little package that can fit on a key ring.

After several iterations, the mechanics of the three-layer design were perfected and (as you can hear in the following video) it really does work. Extra points of course go to the fancy eyebrow acrobatics!

Here is how it works:

The air you blow in blows out through the pattern of holes, and at the same time, it makes the turbine spin.

If there was no turbine, the air would just hiss out of the holes, but the holes and blades are designed so that the spinning turbine alternately covers and uncovers the holes, rapidly blocking and releasing the air in a series of pulses that make the noise you hear.

See the Turbine Whistle on Instructables where you can learn from Mark’s thorough project walkthrough. There are plenty of step-by-step photos and of course you can download the files to make a pocket siren of your own.

via Instructables: Turbine Whistle

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Ponoko Customer Blows Past Kickstarter Goal in One Day


Brad Hill is the creator behind LittleRP – A DLP projector-based resin printer that can be put together for as little as $499.

Brad set out to create a printer that was open, flexible and affordable. Rather than using proprietary resins, the LittleRP is designed to use as many different formulations of UV curing resins as possible. By focusing on smaller, higher quality prints, the LittleRP is able to provide high accuracy while keeping costs low.

The flexibility and low cost helps explain the explosive popularity of the LittleRP’s Kickstarter, which passed it’s funding goal of $25,000 is under 24 hours. As of this writing the LittleRP has raised over $98,000, just under 400% of it’s original goal!

The LittleRP’s sleek translucent enclosure is made from Ponoko’s Acrylic Orange Tint, and the housing is made from Melamine Finished MDF seen here:

The LittleRP works using a process known as 3D stereolithography, a 3D printing process that uses light-sensitive resin and a high intensity light source to build a 3D object, layer by layer, rather than using spools of plastic filament as on a majority of 3D printers currently on the market. You can check out the LittleRP in action on it’s Kickstarter Video:

Want to get your hands on your own LittleRP? Head over to Brad’s Kickstarter page to get one while you still can.

Inspired to make your own project? Signup to make and sell for free!

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