Laser Cutting For The Summer!

Laser cut chicks, cows, hats, cats, and koozies!

Above is a multi-dimensional poster of two birds on a swing hanging from a heart tree. It is laser cut acrylic and it comes from Red Berry Guest Book. Ponoko’s Premium Veneer MDF – Cheery would make a beautiful background.

After the jump, cows, hats, cats, and koozies!

(more…)

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The Most Advanced Peanut Butter Mixer Ever

Arduino-Controlled Peanut Butter Mixer from Mark Frauenfelder

Mark Frauenfelder has an awesome writeup of Ponoko over on Foundry – the show and tell site for makers.

If you’re a fan of peanut butter & jelly sandwiches, you’re familiar with the natural separation of oils that occurs after opening your jar of peanut-buttery goodness.

Made from laser cut bamboo from Ponoko – Mark’s Arduino-powered invention helps stirs the yummy ingredients back together for smooth spreading.

This ingenious tool not only helps solve the mess associated with mixing natural peanut butters, it’s a great example of what’s possible when you combine the precision of laser cutting with a bit of creativity.

You could say that ingenuity & laser cutting compliment each other like, well, peanut butter & jelly.

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Laser Cut Play Time

Laser cut tables, boxes, crowns, vinyl organization, and a broken heart

Above is coffee table inspired by Minecraft. It is a take on the simple layered topo but adding the 8-bit pixelation for all the gamers out there. It comes from Martin Raynsford and there a complete run down on how to make it Kitronik. The materials that go into the project are MDF, birch plywood, and acrylic and all available from Ponoko.

After the jump, boxes, crowns, vinyl organization, and a broken heart… (more…)

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Laser Cut And Make A Rainbow

Laser cut looms, feathers, flies, a log, a lamp, and Ryan Gosling…

Above is a laser cut Kumihimo disk. Kumihimo is a form of Japanese cord braiding. These disks are laser cut from acrylic and from 52 Lasers (take of look for more information – including a link to a Kumihimo disk generator).

After the jump, feathers, flies, a log, a lamp, and Ryan Gosling…

(more…)

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Laser cut skulls

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #223

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a paper craft skull from Cardboard Sarfari.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page – we just reached 1000 likes!

After the jump, another skull, a birdhouse, Mickey, and a ukulele… (more…)

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Laser cut teeth

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #222

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is Tiny Hands on a Roll’s laser cut Shark and Fish pin. We have featured the great work from humble elephant before – not they have a Kickstarter for their amazing rolling pins.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, pipes, crochet, cacti, and gems… (more…)

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Laser cut replica Wolcott mirror camera

Creating a miniature replica of pioneering photographic technology

With cameras at our fingertips at almost every waking moment, taking a quick selfie or a snapping a portrait of your nearest and dearest (yes, cats count too!) is something most of us do every day. For photographer Guy J. Brown, the passion for portraiture goes a little deeper; in fact, he specialises in recreating pioneering photographic techniques and devices.

One such device is the Wolcott Camera, said to be the first ever patented back in 1840. Guy has utilised the technology of his 21st century workshop to bring this early portrait machine back to life. The result is something to behold… with laser cut ply components designed in Adobe Illustrator, and hardware purchased from eBay completing the ‘baby Wolcott’.

Follow through to the source link to find out more about this project, including a deeper look at the original Wolcott camera. You can also download files to construct your own nostalgic photographic device – and then show those Instagram filters how it’s really done.

Are you a laser-equipped retro shutterbug too? Tell us about your laser cut camera experience in the comments below.

via Guy J Brown – Laser Cut Wolcott Camera

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Laser cut smoke

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #219

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut zebra wood vaporizer box from Michael’s Handmade.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, circuits and charging stations… (more…)

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Ponoko Customer Blasts Past Kickstarter Goal in 3 hours

Another Kickstarter success using Ponoko

UPDATE: The Electric Eel Wheel has now raised over $40,928! Huge congrats to Maurice & Emily on reaching over 800% of their goal!

Maurice Ribble is the Boston based engineer behind the Electric Eel Wheel – a clever electric spinning wheel that makes it easy to spin the fiber of your choice into yarn.

Maurice’s Kickstarter campaign blew past it’s $5,000 goal in just three hours – and is on track to break $20,000 in under a week.

The Electric Eel Wheel was already a huge hit in the hobby fiber, spinning, and knitting communities, so it made sense to make the jump to Kickstarter. “I figured this would be a good project for it because nothing like it has been done before” Maurice says, ”my wife who’s been helping with this project really liked the idea of doing a Kickstarter so that’s what really decided it for me.”

Traditionally, yarn is spun with a foot powered spinning wheel – a time consuming process that tends to be hard to master. While there are electric alternatives available, quality wheels are costly- with price tags of $800 or more. This gap in the market was part of the inspiration for the Electric Eel Wheel.

Using laser cut parts from Ponoko, Maurice and his wife Emily set out to create their own electric spinning wheel that was affordable, while still being as good or better than the ones currently on the market.

Maurice says using Ponoko made it easy to reduce costs by iterating through different designs. “I was surprised at how much spending some time optimizing the part layout cut my costs.” he says  ”For me it almost cut my costs by half because I was able to share a lot of edges and use the materials more efficiently.”

While this is the fourth commercially available version of the wheel, Maurice was still able to find ways to improve the design and add new innovative features:

“Once I get my hand on the laser cut Ponoko pieces I assemble it and I almost always get ideas on how I might improve it during assembly. When those improvements are getting small I know I’m at the stage where it’s good enough.”

Maurice credits the research he did, as well as the feedback he got early on as the key to Electric Eel Wheel’s explosive success. “I read a lot about how to launch a Kickstarter campaign. Making a good video is important so I spent a lot of time on that.” Maurice says, “I shared it with a few close friends to build my confidence and get feedback on what I might tweak.”

When we asked Maurice what advice he would give to people just starting out with Kickstarter, he warned entrepreneurs-to-be not to let expansion or addition of new features hurt your project:

“Don’t let feature creep hurt your project. First you need to decide when it’s good enough to put on Kickstarter. Some of the ideas that come in are good and I do leave my options open, but you need to always consider pros and cons before adding something.”

Want to get your hands on your own Electric Eel wheel and start spinning your own yarn? The Electric Eel Wheel is available through Kickstarter at a discounted price, with packages ranging from $149-$209.

Got a great hardware idea of your own? Make and sell it with Ponoko.

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Laser cut voids

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #218

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut leather top from Julio Alejandro Rodriguez Pozos.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, lace, leaf, cipher, and tape… (more…)

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