Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #32

Laser Cut Glider Business Card

Laser-Cut-Glider-business-card

Watch your brand take flight with this playful idea for a business card makeover. Canadian model aircraft supplier Norburn put a sample of their wares right into potential customers’ hands thanks to a snap-fit mini glider incorporated into their business card design.

The simple but fully functional flyer easily assembles from three components that pop out of the card. The fuselage and wings give plenty of space to lay out all the key company info, and although the assembled plane may not fit back into your wallet so well, chances are you’re not going to forget these guys any time soon.

Inspiration for your brand

The surface area provided by a business card may be small, but as this glider shows, that doesn’t mean you can’t have fun there with some laser cut designs. Taking an aspect of what your company does, and turning it into a simple 3D assembly, gives people an interactive way to engage with your brand and generate a memorable connection. Adding in the functional element of (in this example) a glider that can actually fly would make for a real conversation starter at events or in the retail environment.

This design came from the clever minds over at Rethink Communications, and you can see another DIY version from tinkerer Katy Gero.

Can you think of a playful laser cut business card conversion using the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

via The Inspiration Room

Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #31

Layers and Shadows

BERLIN laser cut layers

The play of light and shade on crisp laser cut linework has an eye-catching impact that is both dynamic and alluring. With only a little more effort than it would take to prepare files for printing in a more traditional 2d format, it is possible to use the same visual structure to create laser cut layered artwork that can literally jump out from the page.

Why does it work so well?

The example pictured above demonstrates that this approach to 3-dimensional graphic design can be applied with great effect to simple text and logos. When given only a partially complete outline of each letter, the eye naturally resolves the missing details. Further support from environmental lighting can also enhance the stratification in the design. This allows the geometric forms of the custom font to be instantly recognisable even without prior knowledge of what the typeface looks like.

How to use this technique with your brand

Some of the best laser cut designs are also the simplest. This is particularly true when working with layered material and sections that are cut or removed; the less complicated your design can be, the fewer the potential errors when it all comes together. Remember to work with the strengths of laser cutting, making use of (to name a few): crisp linework, precision alignment and the elegance of accurate repetition.

Can you think of a clever way to harness light and shade using laser cutting with the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

image source: viral3k.com

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #29

Promo Items That Force You To Stop And Take Notice

branded-notebook

We’ve all come to expect a ‘swag bag’ at every promotional event we go to.

And now that the practice of receiving free stuff has become so common, it’s almost a blind spot. Which is why it’s so much harder to get it right.

But rather than scour the web to find the most outlandish items to stuff into your bag, what you really need to consider is context. Get that right and knowing what to put into your swag bag will come almost automatically.

To inspire you and get you thinking about your next event, here are some examples of brands who got it right the first time …

Tap Into A Relevant Trend.
If you look around, you’ll find there are a few key trends which people are gravitating towards these days – health, food, technology. Here’s a great example of using a health-related trend to get attendees’ to notice your brand:    (more…)

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #28

A Vision for the New Year

The impact of Google Cardboard on the accessibility of virtual reality has been dramatic. While not quite in the same league as ‘true’ VR headsets such as Oculus or Sony’s offerings, it is remarkable what can be achieved using the Cardboard platform for under $10.

One benefit of the accessibility of Google Cardboard is that it is an ideal vehicle for promotional messaging. The platform has been used for advertising campaigns by some pretty big players, as well as a myriad of small-scale campaigns and personal projects.

What is Google Cardboard?

Watch the intro movie below to see how the New York Times introduce their viewer in a campaign that saw the units distributed to over 1 million subscribers. The portal at NYTVR showcases a collection of highly refined immersive clips filmed specifically for use in these virtual reality headsets.

 

The high tech approach to low tech

For a really polished example of Google Cardboard at its finest, look no further than the Volvo XC90 campaign. Using some serious high-tech equipment, they were able to film an immersive experience that enables people to get a sense of what it is like to be physically inside the new car. The Volvo Cardboard viewer has also received a fancy facelift, going beyond everyday cardboard to reflect the luxury feel of the brand.

 

Are you ready to go Virtual in the new year?

Can you think of a way to create your own branded laser cut Cardboard Viewer? Although the content associated with these two examples looks pretty slick, the physical platform itself is still based on the same core components. With freely available plans for the structure to be laser cut, it is surprisingly easy to achieve unique, engaging results from more modest materials and equipment.

If the examples from New York Times and Volvo have perked your interest, then you may enjoy looking further at how others have made use of this affordable technology. There were also some creative submissions to the Ponoko Cardboard Design competition, showing there is still plenty of room for clever adaptations and customizations. Let us know in the comments below how your company can use Google Cardboard to dazzle and delight your customers’ minds.

 

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #27

‘Swag Bag’ Items Destined To End Up In The ‘Trash Bag’

swag_tote_bag

Giving away promotional items at an event isn’t a new idea.

But just because this trend has been running for a while doesn’t mean it’s foolproof. If you don’t put enough thought into exactly what goes into your swag bag, chances are you’ll be forgotten minutes after the event. Or worse still, be remembered as the dorky brand that handed out real junk. While this kind of bad press would have faded quickly in the past, social media ensures embarrassment now follows you around for days and its impact can last much, much longer.

While choosing the right items for your swag bag depends on your company message, your audience and the event you’re attending, here are 10 wrong ones you must definitely avoid.

Branded Key Chains.

keychaain

It used to be cool to get a keychain in your swag bag, until everyone started giving them out. And right now, it’s become one of the least effective ways to get attendees to remember your brand. Of course, some companies think they’ve worked their way around ubiquity by adding other functions to their keychain. But most conference attendees already have enough bottle openers and whistles or pen torches around and don’t need one more.       (more…)

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #26

Cool Conference Swag You Could Laser Cut For Pennies!

Packing for a conference is a lot like packing for a hike.

You have to pack the essentials, you want to pack a few standby items and you’d like to bring certain vanity items along, just for the heck of it. But as you pack, you also need to keep a check on the weight of your pack. Plus, unlike a hike where you probably won’t encounter more than one or two people at most, a conference is full of people who are eager to hand you bags of stuff!

Yet before you begin rummaging through conference bags for stuff to keep, here’s a quick list of things most attendees wish they had brought along which can be laser cut really cheap.

Simple Conversation Starters.

Lasercutwristband

Laser Cut Wristbands.
While you will do your best to network before the session and during the breakout periods, the fact is you won’t be able to approach as many people as you’d like. But rather than rush through conversations with multiple people, you can use a little laser cut panache to draw people to you.

If designed well, this is bound to get you noticed even when you do something as simple as answer a phone call. It also helps you stand out in a crowd by acting as a distinct visual marker. Within a conference setting, you get instantly noticed if you have to raise your hand. And finally, it can be a great way to share your personal details without having to repeat them over and over (just in case your name or email has a complex spelling). Plus, if you run out of business cards, or don’t feel the need to share a business card with certain people … you can redirect them to your wristband for your details instead of the awkward fumble for a pen and napkin.

Things That Make You Memorable.

lasercutbusinesscard

Laser Cut Business Cards.
Getting noticed is only half the battle. Your next step is to leave a lasting impression on your new acquaintances. Here are some easy to produce laser cut items, which can do the trick.      (more…)

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Ponoko designs & makes promo products from scratch for event marketers.  Hit us up for a free quote.

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How To Increase Profits with the Best Pricing For Retail

Keep your expectations realistic to secure the highest returns 

Without a careful, methodical approach, it can be difficult for makers (and indeed small businesses) to find the right balance when it comes to pricing their products. Let’s take a look at the considerations and contributing factors, so that this critical part of running a maker business can be controlled to work in your favor.

If you’re making as a hobby, then profits may not be such a priority – but a business cannot be sustainable if it does not turn a profit.

Setting a price for your products

In the creative marketplace, there are 3 key components to consider:

  1. Your cost price
  2. Your wholesale price
  3. Your retail price

This is the simplest breakdown, where the cost price refers to the sum of all the cash costs that go into making each product; the wholesale price is the cost price plus the amount you want to earn for your idea and your time (this can be seen as a ‘creative fee’, but we’ll get to that later); and the retail price is made up of your wholesale price plus the retail margin.

When seen in this way, a general guideline can be followed with the ratio of 1:2:4 where $1 of cost will have a $2 wholesale price and a $4 retail price.

Looking at it from the other direction can also help, as the focus on starting with the final selling price has a stronger connection to the reality of your target market – ie, the price of competing products. There is no point working out a price based on your own production costs, only to find that you are no longer competitive in the marketplace once your product reaches retailers.

Therefore, the simple equation looks like this:

Profitable Retail Price = 2x Wholesale price = 2x Total Production Cost.

How do you calculate your Creative Fee?

The tricky part, particularly when you are just starting out, is how to account for your creative spark and your design/assembly/packaging/marketing/etc time. How long do you spend assembling each product? What about all those trips to the post office? Every moment you spend doing ‘work’ should be accounted for, and given an appropriately proportioned value to insert into your calculations.

There is a handy Ponoko walkthrough on how to calculate these figures that can really help to prevent you from falling into the common trap of under-pricing your products.

Tough negotiations with retailers

Selling direct from your bedroom home office is one thing, but when retailers put the squeeze on you for tighter and tighter margins, the figures you carefully worked to when just starting out can suddenly leave you operating at a loss!

The Ponoko Cost Saving Guide uses a set of laser cut coasters to simulate the full process from initial design through to high turnover retail product. It makes for interesting reading, with a guided navigation through all the considerations that contribute to product pricing.

These include:

Minimum Order Size
Most Profitable Order Size
Minimum Wholesale Order Size
Tough Retailer Negotiations 

Knowing where your boundaries are in terms of lowest acceptable price and also highest realistic goals before you engage in large volume orders can make the difference between whether you actually realise a profit or not.

Making a Profit

Profit is very important, if you are seeing your making as a business venture.

There is no rule that you have to make a profit! It is totally ok to be making for the joy of making, but consider that without profits from your efforts, it can be very difficult to continue your passion for making things for others. When you make a profit, you are also creating new possibilities for yourself… so without a profit, you are not going to be running a business for very long.

Once dollars are involved, rules become very important. In Chris Anderson’s 10 Rules For Maker Businesses, profit heads the list, and with good reason. Reading through these articles will give you many tools and insights that can help to set and maintain realistic goals for your maker business.

“…if you don’t get the price right at the start, you won’t be able to keep making” – Chris Anderson

Let us know in the comments below what your personal experience has been in balancing the tricky task of how to achieve the best pricing for your retail products.

 

10 Rules For Maker Businesses

Ponoko Cost Saving Guide

Stop Under-Pricing your Design Products

 

 

Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #23

Laser Cut Fashion

laser cut fashion example

The intricate designs enabled by laser cut textiles are no longer an exclusive novelty for the haute couture runway scene. The bold fashion statements enabled by laser cutting are now within the grasp of the everyday consumer, with leather, silk and other textiles ideally suited to the digital manufacturing process.

Delicate patterns reminiscent of fine lace and needlework lend themselves well to laser cutting, but as we can see in the image above, bold shapes and iconic imagery can be just as effective.

With some clever design thinking, laser cutting has also enabled more exotic materials to become wearable garments. The wooden t-shirt below by Pauline Marcombe uses laser cut panels attached together with wire, transforming what was once a rigid material into a malleable interlocking form of modern body armour.

laser cut fashion wood shirt pauline marcombe

Why would you turn to laser cutting for brand promotion? For one, the eye-catching impact of these fashion items invites attention and a healthy curiosity… but also, thanks to the laser cutting process, there is much scope for design freedom and customization at a price that is accessible to the consumer.

How can your brand stand out amongst all the other fashonistas using the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #22

Laser Cut Pop Up Text

anthropologiepopuptext

It makes sense that with many promotional products and messaging items, the choice of typography plays a major role in whether your messaging gets through to people. One way to literally stand out from the crowd can be to create something that looks interesting and encourages a simple physical interaction, all within the text itself.

This eye-catching example of 3D text with a difference came from the forward-thinking fashionistas at Anthropologie. The event invitation would have looked appropriately refined and stylish printed onto white card, if only a more traditional approach had been taken. However, the simple transformation of laser cutting a portion of the font outline completely changes how the recipient reads the message. Each word can be folded out to stand proud from the surface, making perspective, light and shadow all contribute to a more memorable sensorial experience.

Could your corporate messaging take on a whole new impact using the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

Let’s Talk Ideas

Ponoko designs & makes promo products from scratch for event marketers.  Hit us up for a free quote.

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How To Help Your Client Launch a Kickstarter Campaign

Head off Crowdfunding questions with these useful tips and resources

kickstarter-help

Crowdfunding campaigns give entrepreneurs, artists and businesses a unique opportunity to test the viability of their ideas. Yet for many, the thought of running a Kickstarter campaign can be a daunting prospect.

So how can you help de-mystify the process, and give your client the tools and support they need to embrace all that Kickstarter has to offer? Let’s take a look at some of the contributing factors that enable campaigns to reach – and indeed exceed – their funding goals.

Choosing the right platform
The first question to ask is whether or not this method of raising funds is actually suitable for your business proposal. Each crowdfunding platform has its quirks and benefits, and in the example of Kickstarter, many submissions do not even pass the approval phase. It is well worth taking the time to identify which crowdfunding option best suits your business model and potential project outcome.

Don’t be dazzled by dollar signs – just because there are campaigns raising millions of dollars does not mean that every campaign will be an overwhelming success. For the majority of campaigns, a few thousand or even just a few hundred dollars over the target amount can be a big deal.

Be prepared to work hard
Although crowdfunding has been shown to be surprisingly lucrative for some, successful outcomes are not guaranteed. It takes more than just having a bright idea; you have to know your project very well and be prepared to put time into every stage of the funding process. Understand that for every hour you spend (and there will be many!) on preparing the campaign, there will be just as much time required to maintain and promote the project through to completion. Yet even then, your task doesn’t end when the countdown stops. Assuming you are sitting on a pile of money after a successful campaign, you will need to get moving on production and manage the distribution of rewards to your backers.

There is a misconception that a crowdfunded campaign is something that can be done on the side, in your downtime or on the weekends. This is simply not true… one thing that all successful campaigns have in common, regardless of funding levels or project outcomes, is that the campaign itself was a full-time commitment.

Engagement 
There is a strong social media component to the Kickstarter process, with communication and personal interaction playing a large role in backer satisfaction. It can help to remind yourself that Kickstarter is not an online store, even though some backers continue to treat it like one. Integral to successful campaigns is the way people love to feel like they are involved in making things happen. This is a different consumer experience than traditional online shopping, and with careful planning you can use that to your advantage. Choose a variety of rewards including smaller contributions that can help keep people interested in your progress, even if they aren’t in a position to commit larger amounts of money during the campaign. These potential future customers can become informal brand ambassadors through their own social media activity, expanding your reach before the campaign reaches its conclusion.

Be realistic
Not all campaigns are successful, and that is ok. The reasons why a campaign does not reach its funding goals can be quite varied, and are sometimes just as mysterious as to why other campaigns dramatically exceed expectations. When setting up a crowdfunding campaign, plan out how you will navigate through both failure and success, so that your business can continue to evolve beyond the campaign timeline.

Assistance
Don’t be shy – a Kickstarter campaign is a lot to take on, and it is perfectly ok to seek out help. In fact, many services are popping up that enable a streamlining of each aspect of the campaign. Gathering and processing information beforehand will help to protect you from nasty surprises and also empower you to fully exploit successes and opportunities should they come your way. Here are a few to start you off:

The Ultimate Guide to Crowdfunding
Presented by Shopify, the ecommerce solution of choice for many successful campaigns. This thorough walkthrough over 23 chapters covers all the key considerations to be aware of before taking on your own Kickstarter campaign.

How To Make a Successful Kickstarter Campaign
Using the Pebble Watch as a case study, this detailed investigation looks at how a 24 year old guy’s project with a goal of $100,000 became a $10 million record-breaker.

Tools for Kickstarter: Planning Calculator
A handy tool from Reuben Pressman, you can generate a quick overview of whether your numbers will all stack up. The calculator also includes a valuable Incentives component that will help to resolve the allocation of backer rewards.

Social Media services: Backercamp
Communication and Marketing for your campaign will get a huge boost if you call in the experts to lend a hand.

Manage your Mail: Green Inbox
With so much content flooding your clients’ email and social media, direct personalised messaging gets through to people and saves you time.

Look your best on camera: Elevant Productions
The influence a refined video clip has on campaign success rates is huge. Get it right first time for maximum impact on the small screen.

Case Studies: Success Stories
Also from Shopify, this breakdown of eleven campaigns highlights what they did right and what they did wrong, providing many valuable insights.

Analysis and Infographics
In-depth analysis of campaign metrics, trends and a very handy infographic that helps to navigate The Untold Story behind Kickstarter Stats.

The task of setting realistic goals, achievable rewards and establishing effective communication with backers is often more complex than people first anticipate. By investing a little time in making the most of these resources, the entire campaign experience becomes a whole lot more manageable. Don’t underestimate the impact that thorough preparation can have. By approaching your campaign with the knowledge that you are prepared for any surprises that may pop up – whether they are positive or negative – you will be ready to rise to the challenge.

Are you using the Ponoko Personal Factory to produce rewards for a campaign? Let us know in the comments below and we’ll discuss the best way to help you reach your funding goals.