Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #37

Laser Etched QR Codes

laser QR 1

Our devices are talking to each other every day, and with all this chatter going on, making new connections or transferring data should be an effortless process. Technologies such as NFC (Near Field Communication) and QR (Quick Response) Codes help to make these digital interactions smooth and simple. Continue reading to discover how you can use laser cutting to integrate these technologies into your products.

How does NFC and QR work?

For NFC to work, information is encoded onto an embedded chip. When two devices containing NFC chips come into contact (usually in the form of a bump or light tap) a process is engaged – payment could be transferred, data and audio connections established or other tasks involving interaction between the two devices.

QR codes operate much like a barcode; they contain a set of reference information that can be scanned using the camera on a smartphone. This prompts the device to access information such as a website address, play a video, or (as in the example above) display login credentials.

Why is this useful for your brand?

The ability to seamlessly connect can give your customers immediate access to a deeper level of information. This means you can add collateral such as image galleries, video clips and other detailed supporting content without consuming valuable real estate on your product. There is much scope to have fun with QR Codes as well as to use them for sensible, straightforward communication.

In the example shown here, Instructables user BWRussell needed a way to share the login details for his wireless network. Tired of spelling out the passphrase to relatives and visitors, he constructed his own dongle that houses an NFC chip and a laser etched QR Code. All visitors need to do is tap or scan the code with their mobile device, and they will be granted access to the network.

It is worth noting that when it comes to the actual physical QR code, a similar functional outcome can be achieved with a desktop printer… however, a laser etched QR code has a greater sense of quality and purpose.

Laser QR 2

See more of this DIY approach to NFC and QR from Instructables user BWRussell.

Can your laser cutting make connecting easy using the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #36

Laser Cut Cross Stitching

laser cut cross stitch

The crafty, handmade look of cross stitch embroidery has something wonderfully warm and fuzzy about it. While the regular grid of holes speaks of an industrial precision, the contrast of woven yarn introduces a human element that is organic and inviting.

Laser Cut Cross Stitch Inspiration

The pendant above was made by Rebecca from Hugs are Fun as a gift for her dad. Over time, Rebecca has refined her techniques to become a bit of an expert at making all kinds of laser cut cross stitched whimsies. It’s well worth browsing through her website for inspiration, patterns, project ideas and even items to purchase.

How to use Laser Cutting for cross stitching

Cross stitching describes an embroidery technique of tracing out patterns using yarn or other coiled materials. In these particular examples, the yarn is threaded through a defined pattern of laser cut holes to generate the raster-like effect. With a little creative thought and planning, you can come up with many interesting variants based on this core idea.

The material of choice can be any of our usual laser cutting favorites. Bamboo ply, acrylic, metals or even leather and felt will all respond well as substrates for the cross stitch technique.

For versatile cross stitched patterns, a grid of laser cut holes will allow for quirky pixellated artwork or logos. It can also be effective to cut only the holes you need to define the form; leaving the substrate surface bare either to have presence in its own right or as an optional space for further laser etched details.

Can you give your brand a cross stitched crafty twist with the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #35

Illuminated laser etched business card

laser-etched-illuminated-card

Handing out cards is a networking ritual that is still going strong, and for good reasons. As a conversation starter and trigger for memory recall, the trusty business card plays an important role… but with all the cards that get passed around at events, how can you make sure yours stands out from the crowd?

This bright example, designed by Uk creative agency The Big A for artist Ghizlan el Glaoui, shows that there are indeed alternatives to printed cardstock. Although it may not be something she’s handing out to every passer-by, it would certainly have an impact for the select few who do receive one.

How does it work?

A laser cutter was used to etch artwork and text into the clear acrylic surface, with the result almost invisible when viewed in natural light. This all changes when the material is lit from an edge, in a process known as total internal reflection. For Ghizlan’s illuminated business card, a small LED embedded in the corner is activated with a gentle squeeze, lighting up a sample of her artwork along with her signature and key contact info.

How can your brand’s image be illuminated with laser cutting from the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

via PSFK

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #34

Themed ‘Build Your Own’ event kits

honeymoonkit0

Diy kits are a great way to engage people with the world that your brand inhabits. From a collection of snap-together laser cut parts, a miniature diorama can be created that entertains and stimulates playful conversation.

Connect to an event

The example here comes from Michiel Post van der Molen’s wedding, where guests were given a Build Your Own Honeymoon kit that enabled them to become immersed in the newlywed spirit. The package contained iconic laser cut silhouettes along with a felt base, where a grid of slots allowed personal interpretations of the ideal romantic getaway to be clipped into place.


honeymoonkit3

honeymooncollage2

Connecting with your brand

What unique worlds can be created to connect people with your brand using laser cutting from the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. By handing out simple, thoughtful construction kits to potential customers, there is an opportunity for them to become new storytellers and enthusiastic brand ambassadors. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #33

Sweeten up your laser cutting

laser-cut-typography-honey-yum

Here is a great way to use laser cutting to help your brand stand out from the crowd. We already know that laser cut letters have serious impact when compared to printed alternatives… there’s something that really grabs you when a typeface stands proud in 3D.

For Agencies and Brands, the need to go one step further in order to draw in the target audience can lead to some interesting design explorations.

Mouth-watering appeal

The use of food, with all of its associations and temptations, opens up a number of unusual opportunities to enhance laser cut objects.

We’re wired to respond positively to sweet things. There’s something about desserts, particularly sweet ones, and it’s hard to get any sweeter than honey. Putting the sensorial experience of eating honey aside, actual honey is also a visual marvel with its mesmerising molten viscous motion and deep golden glow.

Here is a great example of this combination of food and laser cutting working really well together. Giving laser cut letters a unique eye-catching appeal, this experimental typeface takes inspiration from the classic wooden honey dipper. It is only once the honey is added that the letters become complete.

Laser cut typography honey

How did this come about?

When challenged to create a liquid-inspired typeface with minimal post-production, Franc Navarro and Alberto Martinez from IED Barcelona turned to honey coated laser cutting.

“We were attracted to the simplicity of structuring layers of wood, the mesmerizing viscosity and warm tonalities that honey has.”

Can you think of other playful ways to combine food with laser cutting from the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

via Design Hooked

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #32

Laser Cut Glider Business Card

Laser-Cut-Glider-business-card

Watch your brand take flight with this playful idea for a business card makeover. Canadian model aircraft supplier Norburn put a sample of their wares right into potential customers’ hands thanks to a snap-fit mini glider incorporated into their business card design.

The simple but fully functional flyer easily assembles from three components that pop out of the card. The fuselage and wings give plenty of space to lay out all the key company info, and although the assembled plane may not fit back into your wallet so well, chances are you’re not going to forget these guys any time soon.

Inspiration for your brand

The surface area provided by a business card may be small, but as this glider shows, that doesn’t mean you can’t have fun there with some laser cut designs. Taking an aspect of what your company does, and turning it into a simple 3D assembly, gives people an interactive way to engage with your brand and generate a memorable connection. Adding in the functional element of (in this example) a glider that can actually fly would make for a real conversation starter at events or in the retail environment.

This design came from the clever minds over at Rethink Communications, and you can see another DIY version from tinkerer Katy Gero.

Can you think of a playful laser cut business card conversion using the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

via The Inspiration Room

Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #31

Layers and Shadows

BERLIN laser cut layers

The play of light and shade on crisp laser cut linework has an eye-catching impact that is both dynamic and alluring. With only a little more effort than it would take to prepare files for printing in a more traditional 2d format, it is possible to use the same visual structure to create laser cut layered artwork that can literally jump out from the page.

Why does it work so well?

The example pictured above demonstrates that this approach to 3-dimensional graphic design can be applied with great effect to simple text and logos. When given only a partially complete outline of each letter, the eye naturally resolves the missing details. Further support from environmental lighting can also enhance the stratification in the design. This allows the geometric forms of the custom font to be instantly recognisable even without prior knowledge of what the typeface looks like.

How to use this technique with your brand

Some of the best laser cut designs are also the simplest. This is particularly true when working with layered material and sections that are cut or removed; the less complicated your design can be, the fewer the potential errors when it all comes together. Remember to work with the strengths of laser cutting, making use of (to name a few): crisp linework, precision alignment and the elegance of accurate repetition.

Can you think of a clever way to harness light and shade using laser cutting with the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

image source: viral3k.com

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #30

Having a ball

laser-cut-ball

Give a bunch of people something round that can be thrown, caught, bounced or rolled… and within moments an impromptu game will have started. Even the non-sporty types are likely to join in, so strong is the allure of the ubiquitous ball.

This clever flat-packed ball from Instructables user Scientiffic is comprised of only two simple laser-cut components. Repeated and then snapped together with no need for glues or adhesives, it is a neat example of how you can make a robust and functional object from basic elements.

laser-cut-ball-pattern2

What does an object like this do for your brand?

Engaging customers with a physical object that can then become a light-hearted networking tool allows your brand to form a different kind of association at an event. Incorporating the tactile process of assembling the ball, then adding in the element of play either as an introverted solo activity or as a way to interact with others may indeed prove to be more engaging (and therefore more memorable) than the usual event swag.

A vehicle for your corporate identity

The example here from Instructables shows the components of a ball that have been laser cut from wood. Ways to adapt this design could include the addition of company branding as a laser etched detail, or even changing materials to use acrylic in colors that match your company’s colorway. Other options to generate interest and encourage interaction could involve the addition of simple electronics to illuminate the material from within, or add engagement triggers such as sound or motion sensitive functionality.

Can you think of other ways to make an interactive conversation starter using the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #29

Promo Items That Force You To Stop And Take Notice

branded-notebook

We’ve all come to expect a ‘swag bag’ at every promotional event we go to.

And now that the practice of receiving free stuff has become so common, it’s almost a blind spot. Which is why it’s so much harder to get it right.

But rather than scour the web to find the most outlandish items to stuff into your bag, what you really need to consider is context. Get that right and knowing what to put into your swag bag will come almost automatically.

To inspire you and get you thinking about your next event, here are some examples of brands who got it right the first time …

Tap Into A Relevant Trend.
If you look around, you’ll find there are a few key trends which people are gravitating towards these days – health, food, technology. Here’s a great example of using a health-related trend to get attendees’ to notice your brand:    (more…)

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #28

A Vision for the New Year

The impact of Google Cardboard on the accessibility of virtual reality has been dramatic. While not quite in the same league as ‘true’ VR headsets such as Oculus or Sony’s offerings, it is remarkable what can be achieved using the Cardboard platform for under $10.

One benefit of the accessibility of Google Cardboard is that it is an ideal vehicle for promotional messaging. The platform has been used for advertising campaigns by some pretty big players, as well as a myriad of small-scale campaigns and personal projects.

What is Google Cardboard?

Watch the intro movie below to see how the New York Times introduce their viewer in a campaign that saw the units distributed to over 1 million subscribers. The portal at NYTVR showcases a collection of highly refined immersive clips filmed specifically for use in these virtual reality headsets.

 

The high tech approach to low tech

For a really polished example of Google Cardboard at its finest, look no further than the Volvo XC90 campaign. Using some serious high-tech equipment, they were able to film an immersive experience that enables people to get a sense of what it is like to be physically inside the new car. The Volvo Cardboard viewer has also received a fancy facelift, going beyond everyday cardboard to reflect the luxury feel of the brand.

 

Are you ready to go Virtual in the new year?

Can you think of a way to create your own branded laser cut Cardboard Viewer? Although the content associated with these two examples looks pretty slick, the physical platform itself is still based on the same core components. With freely available plans for the structure to be laser cut, it is surprisingly easy to achieve unique, engaging results from more modest materials and equipment.

If the examples from New York Times and Volvo have perked your interest, then you may enjoy looking further at how others have made use of this affordable technology. There were also some creative submissions to the Ponoko Cardboard Design competition, showing there is still plenty of room for clever adaptations and customizations. Let us know in the comments below how your company can use Google Cardboard to dazzle and delight your customers’ minds.

 

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