An open source analog camera you can 3D print at home

Download it, modify it, print it.

As much as we love low-cost 3D printers and what they can do for makers, their relatively low printing resolution can limit their applications. So it’s always particularly special when someone makes something awesome with a low-res printer.

Léo Marius made this camera for his graduation project from the School of Arts and Design in Saint-Etienne, France. It’s a surprisingly simple construction, and he says it should print in about 15 hours on a Rep-Rap or equivalent. It takes some pretty decent pictures too, especially if you’re into the old-fashioned look. Marius made an Instructable documenting the project, and the files are available on Thingiverse. Check out his blog for information about the development project, but you’ll have to translate it from French.

Continue past the jump for more images, including pictures taken with the printed camera.
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The Neo-Artist: Last chance to get involved

Time is ticking – Kickstarter campaign ends 4pm Friday EDT

When we recently discovered The Neo-Artist, it seemed like Lincoln Kamm was living the dream. He has developed an expertise in helping creative people find ways to produce and sell their work using the latest in digital manufacturing technologies, and now he wants to share it with you.

All of his knowledge (and a few extra practical perks) are condensed into the publication The Neo-Artist, which is the focus of a Kickstarter campaign that wraps up on Friday July 12 at 4pm EDT.

A nice snapshot of what The Neo-Artist is all about can be seen in the clip above, where Lincoln is interviewed by 3D Printer World. Watch the interview to discover more about the campaign, as well as cat-breading and other insights into Lincoln’s creative world that led him to share his expertise in The Neo-Artist.

If you need a little convincing to get involved in this campaign, one of the perks for backers is to receive discounted consultation time with Lincoln himself on your own projects. Imagine having personal, one-on-one time with an expert in making a success of making! Jump on board before it’s too late.

via Kickstarter

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3D printing a prosthetic foot for a duck

Digital fabrication helps Buttercup to walk and swim.

Buttercup the duck was born in a high school biology lab in November 2012 with one foot turned backwards. Since this birth defect rendered him unable to walk or swim, Buttercup’s foot was amputated in preparation for a prosthesis.

After the leg healed, engineers at NovaCopy produced a new foot 3D printed in ABS plastic that will be used to make a mold and then a permanent silicone rubber prosthesis for Buttercup. Follow the story as it continues to unfold on Buttercup’s facebook page.
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Inside 3D Printing early bird prices end this week!

Get 15% off with code PK15

We’ve partnered again with the Inside 3D Printing Conference as it continues its world tour in Chicago this July 10-11. Event prices increase this Friday, so enter our promo-code, PK15, and register today.

With Stratasys and 3D Systems slated to exhibit at the event’s summer edition, the event provides an ideal opportunity to meet with some of the industry’s biggest players and watch 3D printers and services in action.

The event will tackle 3D printing’s impact on food, fashion, art, architecture, design, engineering, weapons, and more. Sessions include: The XYZs of 3D Scanning: Making Reality Digital, Policy Considerations for Additive Manufacturing, Robots Will Make Your Food, 3D Concrete Printing: Full Scale Additive Manufacturing in Architecture and Construction, and 3D Printed Firearms: Additive Manufacturing Meets Hobbyist Gunsmithing. View the full program here.

Keynote presentations will be given by Congressman Bill Foster of the 11th Congressional District of Illinois, Scott Crump, Founder and Chairman of the Board at Stratasys, and Avi Reichental, President & CEO of 3D Systems.

Additional speakers include Mike Vasquez, Additive Manufacturing Technology & Material Specialist, Julie Friedman Steele of The 3D Printer Experience, and Michael Guslick of HaveBlue.org.

You’ll also hear from the designer and architect who created style icon Dita von Teese’s intricate 3D printed dress. Francis Bitonti and Michael Schmidt will discuss 3D printing’s impact on the fashion and art industries, as well as the creative opportunities which exist with innovative materials and techniques.

Save $250 off on-site prices and register before this Friday.

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Stratasys acquires MakerBot

$403m in stock takes MakerBot into the big, big league

There are some who say that MakerBot has done more for DIY 3D printing than almost any other company. Likewise, the venerable industry stalwart Stratasys has long held its own in professional circles. So it kind of makes sense that they should team up together.

The two companies have announced a proposed $403 million in stock to merge MakerBot into the Stratasys fold as a subsidiary entity. MakerBot would continue business as usual, with Bre Pettis remaining at the helm. The same goes for Thingiverse.com, MakerBot’s online portal for sharing user-generated 3D design content.

“…Partnering with Stratasys will allow us to supercharge our mission to empower individuals to make things using a MakerBot, and allow us to bring 3D technology to more people. I am excited about the opportunities this combination will bring to our current and future customers.”
- Bre Pettis

If you’re in New York, you can head down to MakerBot’s headquarters in Brooklyn on Thursday, June 20 at 10am for a joint news conference with Stratasys. The rest of us can access the event live at makerbot.com, and an archive will be made available at http://mbot.co/press062013.

Read the full press release from Stratasys here.

via Engadget

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The Neo-Artist: a high-tech guide to making

One man’s mission to solve the economic downturn for creative people.

Lincoln Kamm spent 12 years in the animation industry before breaking out and producing his own works. He has since met with notable success with six-figure sales and is now helping others learn how they too can do the same.

In an upcoming publication The Neo-Artist, Lincoln expands on his college lecture series and consulting experience. The book is a treasure-trove of knowledge that aims to teach creative people about the latest in high-tech hardware and software for turning ideas into real physical objects.

Topics covered include 3D printing and laser cutting, designing custom electronics, clothing and more. Most importantly, The Neo-Artist will also show how to make other aspects of the available technologies work for you to help market and sell your work. It’s perfect for makers who are just starting out and will still have plenty to offer those who have been in business for years, guiding them to the next level and beyond.

So if you are a creative person who’s into technology, be sure to take part in The Neo-Artist Kickstarter campaign and make a pledge to secure yourself a copy of the book. It’s time to leave the rat race behind.

The Neo Artist via Kickstarter

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Inside 3D Printing conference coming to Chicago

Get 15% off conference passes

After a successful event in NYC this spring, Inside 3D Printing is coming to Chicago next month, July 10-11.

Keynote speakers include Illinois Congressman Bill Foster, Stratasys founder Scott Crump, and 3D Systems CEO Avi Reichental. Other speakers will discuss topics ranging from policy (3D printing and the future of Intellectual Property, the rapid manufacture of weapons) to mass adoption (desktop printers from start to finish, 3D printing adoption in retail and branding) to innovative new uses in food, fashion, architecture, and electronics.

There’s also a full day’s schedule of tutorials and an exhibition hall of the latest 3D printing products, projects, and services.

Register for the event and save 15% with code PK15!

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3D printed ukulele

Digital manufacturing never sounded so sweet * UPDATE * video added!

There is a saying amongst ukulele players. It goes something along the lines of “Music self played is happiness self made.” So imagine how happy Matthew must be, as he strums away on his 3D printed ukulele!

We’ve seen an impressive folding laser cut uke before, and it was only a matter of time before someone had a serious crack at 3D printing one. Matthew (aka Koa Soprano) is no stranger to making his own musical devices, having previously tried his hand at violins and other stringed instruments.

His ukulele is something different though. Printed on a Stratasys Dimension 1200es 3D printer, it took about 37 hours for the body, neck and pegs to be produced. Allowance had to be made for the build area of the printer, which means that the headstock is a little shorter than usual. A neat dovetail was planned in to the Solidworks model so that the neck and body can be easily assembled after printing. Pegs were printed both horizontally and vertically to see which orientation produced a neater result.

Click through to see the finished instrument, as well as a few insights into pitfalls that were overcome during the printing process.

* UPDATE * video included after the break!
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MIT’s Silk Pavilion inspired by silkworm cocoons

Algorithmic design, digital fabrication, and silkworms work together to make a pavilion.

MIT MediaLab’s Mediated Matter group used inspiration from the cocoons of silkworms for the Silk Pavilion. Silkworm cocoons are made from one long, continuous silk thread. The pavilion uses the same approach, but with some high-tech help.
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The sweetest 3D printing of all

Sugar prints that are good enough to eat

Sculptural geometric forms take on a delicious twist with a sweet approach to 3D printing from The Sugar Lab.

It all started when husband and wife team Kyle and Liz von Hasseln wanted to make a sweet gift for a friend’s birthday. Without an oven and therefore unable to bake a cake, the duo applied their architectural skills and set out to 3D print one. What resulted was a simple cupcake with “Chelsea” (the friend’s name) printed in sugar across the top. Excited by the experimentation process, Kyle and Liz have refined the sugar printing technique to produce some stunning – and possibly quite delicious – sculptural forms.

The process uses alternating strands of sugar with layers of a water and alcohol solution that seals and solidifies the sugar.     (more…)

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