Wrapping up laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #207

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut wood dragonfly ornament from Wood Notions.

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After the jump, cats, clocks, rings, and deer… (more…)

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A truly useless end to the year

Closing out the year with a laser cut Useless Machine

If you’re wondering how to make the most of that ever-so-tempting Ponoko Boxing Day discount, here is a completely useless project idea.

How about building your very own laser cut Useless Machine? Thingiverse user Aaron posted this decorative version, along with instructions on how to make your own diabolical contraption. He has even included handy tips on customisation to suit different material thicknesses.

For those who don’t know, a Useless Machine consists of a simple box with a single switch on the top. Upon activating the switch, a hatch opens up and out pops a lever that turns the switch off again.

Originally invented by Artificial Intelligence pioneer Martn Minsky, the Useless Machine is kind of reminiscent of a 19th century novelty mechanical curio. If you do a bit of research you’ll find dozens of examples of how people have had fun with this idea by creating their own variations, and here is a nice video of Martin talking about what he terms the ‘most useless machine ever made’.

As a laser cutting project for both new and experienced makers, this could in fact prove to be quite useful after all.

Thanks to Aaron on Thingiverse.

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It’s always time for laser cuttng

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #206

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut Chrono Trigger wood clock from GameVetz.

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After the jump, boxes, stencil, and girls in yoga pants… (more…)

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Popping up in sharp relief

Butcher knives become a canvas for artist’s message to mankind

Artist Li Hongbo has developed quite a reputation for his remarkable works in paper. The theme of manipulating intricate cutouts continues in cold hard steel with the series “Shadow of Knives”, where he weaves a cautionary tale about our ever-eager consumer society.

“Shadow of Knives” is a warning to society – human beings will eventually destroy themselves because of their gluttony and their abuse of animals.”

As well as the poignant message, these works are an excellent example of the impact that can be achieved using well-planned cutouts from a flat surface.

See more in the series at Contemporary by Angela Li.

via My Amp Goes To 11

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Laser cut maps and numbers

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #205

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cur walnut plywood map of Ohio from Cut Maps.

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After the jump, Chicago, police boxes,, 10, and three… (more…)

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Rope-O’Matic Kickstarter closing soon

Last chance to get your hands on a laser cut rope braiding machine

When we first came across an earlier version of this laser cut mechanical marvel, it had our heads in quite a spin. The 21st century makeover of an 1890’s industrial artefact is a fantastic example of how laser cutting can enable accessibility to broader technological possibilities.

Ever true to his word, David from Mixed Media Engineering has refined the design and launched a Kickstarter campaign for what is now known as the Rope-O’Matic.

With a diverse range of applications it is hardly surprising that this very unique laser cut product has eclipsed its modest campaign funding goal.

Check it out before you miss your chance… don’t tie yourself in knots, there are only a few days left to secure yourself one of these novel devices.

Rope-O’Matic via Kickstarter

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Laser cut multiples

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #204

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut and powder coated steel bookends from Design Atelier Article.

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After the jump, bees, octopi, chess, and embroidery… (more…)

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Laser cutting, not found

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #203

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut felt coaster from The Little Factory.

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After the jump, a bag and a blazer… (more…)

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Laser cutting looking at you

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #202

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut and etched birch work from Adam Rosenberg.

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After the jump, space ships, gorilla’s, shells, hangers… (more…)

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Laser Cut Terrarium inhabitants

Miniature wooden forest creatures liven up tiny landscapes

With the holiday season fast approaching and Ponoko’s laser cutting deadlines closing even faster, here is a very cute gift idea that can be whipped together quite quickly.

Terrariums have a whimsical otherwordly feel to them, whether they are dangling in antique glassware at your local hipster café or nestled in the corner the Science lab at school. Instructables user Jodi Lynns posted a tutorial on how to make mini terrariums complete with teeny little laser cut critters that help give a new narrative to these snapshots of the natural world.

The Instructable starts off with handy advice on how to prepare and maintain the terrarium itself, which can be quite useful if you’ve never done this kind of thing before. Laser cutting the forest creatures is a straightforward process – source images, create the simple vector artwork for laser cutting and then turn that patch of nature into a living storybook.

via Instructables

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