Laser cut Asia

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #209

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut birch veneer pendant lamp from Fabripod.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, Buddha, Chinese Newyear, and coSine… (more…)

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Laser cut Geneva Drive mechanism

Designing the gears to fit inside a laser cut Automata

The mechanical marvels that are the specialty of Rob Ives don’t just come together overnight. It takes a lot of careful planning and prototyping to get those gears working just right.

In this recent blog post, he reveals the mechanism that will be at the heart of an upcoming Automata. This arrangement of gears is called a Geneva Drive, and it was originally used as a safeguard to prevent clock springs from being over-wound.

“…a particularly interesting mechanism. There is a little window in the background of the model. Through the window you can see a portrait of a woman. As the mechanism runs I need the picture in the window to change to another portrait, then another, then another… and so on. I need the picture to be stay still for a set amount of time then flip quickly to the next picture as the mechanism runs.”

Rob designed the parts in Illustrator before laser cutting his prototypes. It will be exciting to see the final outcome, where these gears will work their mechanical magic.

You can learn more about the Geneva Drive in an earlier blog post from Rob, which features an animation of the gears in action. We often see Ponoko users creating laser cut gears from acrylic, card and wood. Perhaps this adaptation of the Geneva Drive will get your mind turning as well!

via Rob Ives: Notes

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A new year of laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #208

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut bamboo light from Michael Brady Designs.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, rolling pins, gas masks, coasters, lamps, and vases… (more…)

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Building a laser cut and 3D printed PlotClock

Arduino-driven clock that writes the time, erases and repeats

Self-declared “Geek Mom” Debra posts some pretty amazing DIY projects on her blog, and this version she made of the PlotClock is well worth a closer look.

As you can see in the video above, the PlotClock is a timekeeping device that diligently wipes away the previous figures before scrawling the current time with an erasable pen.

“There is something very human and endearing about the motion of the arms as they perform their task of drawing and erasing over and over and over again.”

Debra followed instructions that she found on Thingiverse and incorporated extra modifications suggested by other Thingiverse members. Even still, resolving the design was an iterative process that included using SketchUp to visualise how the mechanism works before sending files to Ponoko for laser cutting.

“The upload and ordering process was very easy.  The hardest part was waiting for the package to arrive.”

And arrive it did, in a timely manner. Read on to discover how she added in a variation of the 3D printed cap for the dry-erase pen, and used the flexibility of Arduino programming to customize the code to the specific requirements of this project.

via Geek Mom Projects

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Wrapping up laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #207

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut wood dragonfly ornament from Wood Notions.

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After the jump, cats, clocks, rings, and deer… (more…)

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A truly useless end to the year

Closing out the year with a laser cut Useless Machine

If you’re wondering how to make the most of that ever-so-tempting Ponoko Boxing Day discount, here is a completely useless project idea.

How about building your very own laser cut Useless Machine? Thingiverse user Aaron posted this decorative version, along with instructions on how to make your own diabolical contraption. He has even included handy tips on customisation to suit different material thicknesses.

For those who don’t know, a Useless Machine consists of a simple box with a single switch on the top. Upon activating the switch, a hatch opens up and out pops a lever that turns the switch off again.

Originally invented by Artificial Intelligence pioneer Martn Minsky, the Useless Machine is kind of reminiscent of a 19th century novelty mechanical curio. If you do a bit of research you’ll find dozens of examples of how people have had fun with this idea by creating their own variations, and here is a nice video of Martin talking about what he terms the ‘most useless machine ever made’.

As a laser cutting project for both new and experienced makers, this could in fact prove to be quite useful after all.

Thanks to Aaron on Thingiverse.

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It’s always time for laser cuttng

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #206

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut Chrono Trigger wood clock from GameVetz.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, boxes, stencil, and girls in yoga pants… (more…)

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Popping up in sharp relief

Butcher knives become a canvas for artist’s message to mankind

Artist Li Hongbo has developed quite a reputation for his remarkable works in paper. The theme of manipulating intricate cutouts continues in cold hard steel with the series “Shadow of Knives”, where he weaves a cautionary tale about our ever-eager consumer society.

“Shadow of Knives” is a warning to society – human beings will eventually destroy themselves because of their gluttony and their abuse of animals.”

As well as the poignant message, these works are an excellent example of the impact that can be achieved using well-planned cutouts from a flat surface.

See more in the series at Contemporary by Angela Li.

via My Amp Goes To 11

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Laser cut maps and numbers

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #205

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cur walnut plywood map of Ohio from Cut Maps.

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After the jump, Chicago, police boxes,, 10, and three… (more…)

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Rope-O’Matic Kickstarter closing soon

Last chance to get your hands on a laser cut rope braiding machine

When we first came across an earlier version of this laser cut mechanical marvel, it had our heads in quite a spin. The 21st century makeover of an 1890’s industrial artefact is a fantastic example of how laser cutting can enable accessibility to broader technological possibilities.

Ever true to his word, David from Mixed Media Engineering has refined the design and launched a Kickstarter campaign for what is now known as the Rope-O’Matic.

With a diverse range of applications it is hardly surprising that this very unique laser cut product has eclipsed its modest campaign funding goal.

Check it out before you miss your chance… don’t tie yourself in knots, there are only a few days left to secure yourself one of these novel devices.

Rope-O’Matic via Kickstarter

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