Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #34

Themed ‘Build Your Own’ event kits

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Diy kits are a great way to engage people with the world that your brand inhabits. From a collection of snap-together laser cut parts, a miniature diorama can be created that entertains and stimulates playful conversation.

Connect to an event

The example here comes from Michiel Post van der Molen’s wedding, where guests were given a Build Your Own Honeymoon kit that enabled them to become immersed in the newlywed spirit. The package contained iconic laser cut silhouettes along with a felt base, where a grid of slots allowed personal interpretations of the ideal romantic getaway to be clipped into place.


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Connecting with your brand

What unique worlds can be created to connect people with your brand using laser cutting from the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. By handing out simple, thoughtful construction kits to potential customers, there is an opportunity for them to become new storytellers and enthusiastic brand ambassadors. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

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Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #33

Sweeten up your laser cutting

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Here is a great way to use laser cutting to help your brand stand out from the crowd. We already know that laser cut letters have serious impact when compared to printed alternatives… there’s something that really grabs you when a typeface stands proud in 3D.

For Agencies and Brands, the need to go one step further in order to draw in the target audience can lead to some interesting design explorations.

Mouth-watering appeal

The use of food, with all of its associations and temptations, opens up a number of unusual opportunities to enhance laser cut objects.

We’re wired to respond positively to sweet things. There’s something about desserts, particularly sweet ones, and it’s hard to get any sweeter than honey. Putting the sensorial experience of eating honey aside, actual honey is also a visual marvel with its mesmerising molten viscous motion and deep golden glow.

Here is a great example of this combination of food and laser cutting working really well together. Giving laser cut letters a unique eye-catching appeal, this experimental typeface takes inspiration from the classic wooden honey dipper. It is only once the honey is added that the letters become complete.

Laser cut typography honey

How did this come about?

When challenged to create a liquid-inspired typeface with minimal post-production, Franc Navarro and Alberto Martinez from IED Barcelona turned to honey coated laser cutting.

“We were attracted to the simplicity of structuring layers of wood, the mesmerizing viscosity and warm tonalities that honey has.”

Can you think of other playful ways to combine food with laser cutting from the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

via Design Hooked

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Laser Cut Cube Reveals Hand Painted Images

A unique image appears on each rotation of this transparent acrylic cube

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There was definitely some careful planning going on when artist Thomas Medicus put together this remarkable laser cut cube titled ‘Emergence Lab’. Upon rotation, a new hand-painted image is revealed from each orientation with a dynamic three-dimensional impact. It really is quite mesmerising… continue reading below for an HD clip of the cube being rotated through all axis.

The cube consists of 216 laser cut acrylic strips assembled into a grid structure. This enables an anamorphic painting to be positioned on each side that is only able to be seen in complete clarity from one specific viewpoint. In order to retain the integrity of the transparent cube, the images have to occupy the same physical space as their counterparts on the opposite side; adding to the complexity of the hand painted designs.

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By using this method of construction for the cube, it makes the task of applying the images much more straightforward – but also results in unwanted reflections within the structure. To get around this, Thomas came up with a clever solution: fill the cube with a silicon oil that has the same refractive index as the acrylic structure. This gives the visual impression of a solid glass block, as the individual facets and surfaces of the acrylic strips blend away to become almost invisible.

 

Can you think of other ways to use silicon oil to enhance the impact of laser cut acrylic from the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below.

Emergence Lab via My Modern Met

Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #30

Having a ball

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Give a bunch of people something round that can be thrown, caught, bounced or rolled… and within moments an impromptu game will have started. Even the non-sporty types are likely to join in, so strong is the allure of the ubiquitous ball.

This clever flat-packed ball from Instructables user Scientiffic is comprised of only two simple laser-cut components. Repeated and then snapped together with no need for glues or adhesives, it is a neat example of how you can make a robust and functional object from basic elements.

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What does an object like this do for your brand?

Engaging customers with a physical object that can then become a light-hearted networking tool allows your brand to form a different kind of association at an event. Incorporating the tactile process of assembling the ball, then adding in the element of play either as an introverted solo activity or as a way to interact with others may indeed prove to be more engaging (and therefore more memorable) than the usual event swag.

A vehicle for your corporate identity

The example here from Instructables shows the components of a ball that have been laser cut from wood. Ways to adapt this design could include the addition of company branding as a laser etched detail, or even changing materials to use acrylic in colors that match your company’s colorway. Other options to generate interest and encourage interaction could involve the addition of simple electronics to illuminate the material from within, or add engagement triggers such as sound or motion sensitive functionality.

Can you think of other ways to make an interactive conversation starter using the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

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Second round for UGEARS self-propelled mechanical models

Extraordinary laser cut machines 

ugears laser cut loco

Having already received a tremendous response to their original Kickstarter campaign, the team from Ugears are not resting on their laurels… they’ve hit the ground running with a 40% increase in production capacity and the enquiries keep on flooding in. So for those who love to marvel at laser cut mechanical wonders, you still have a chance to jump on board the Kickstarter train with a time-limited second round campaign.

Be quick though, because the promo-priced gears stop rolling on January 12!

Who are UGEARS?

Watch the video below to see what UGEARS is all about. You may think you’ve seen impressive laser cut mechanical devices before, but these guys take it to the next level and beyond. Imagine what would happen if you merged the finicky precision of a Swiss watchmaker with a Dad’s club of enthusiastic 21st-century digital makers. A true labor of love, the first model took two years to develop before it was considered ready for production. During this time, the ideas kept flowing and the result is a growing collection of additional products from a tractor to a working safe, a timer to a model dynamometer and no less than 8 other fully functional laser cut plywood whimsies in between.

“Mechanisms have become so tiny. They are hidden so deep inside things that people do not see the whole beauty of rotating gears anymore. What if anybody could get a chance to create a mechanism?”

The second-chance Kickstarter campaign concludes on January 12, and then once the dust has settled, the official UGEARS store will open for business around mid-2016. So if you can’t wait until then, make a pledge on Kickstarter before it’s too late.

Also, it’s good to see these guys are steadily working through their long list of ideas for future mechanical marvels. Head to the UGEARS Instagram for a taste of what they are working on.

UGEARS via Kickstarter

How To Make Laser Cut Interlocking Acrylic Designs

The Importance of Radii

We’ve written about using ‘nodes’ with 3D objects made from wood before, but suggested it may not work for acrylic because it is more brittle and tends to be less forgiving.

However, after working with Drownspire to develop their Vambit toy into a product for a giveaway at Makerfaire, it soon became apparent that you can successfully use nodes when making with acrylic.

Nodes in Acrylic: Two tricks to getting it right

Firstly the nodes need to be a bit smaller; something in the realm of <0.15mm/0.006″ on each side. This means they won’t cover the same range as when used in wood but they still remain a good option.

Secondly, how you treat the end of the slot is the key. If you have a sharp corner, which is typical in a laser cut slot, the acrylic will always fracture at that point. See this example:

Effectively a sharp corner is creating a weak point in the acrylic. Not such a good thing when this is an important structural part of the design! A small radius in that corner can do wonders to transfer the forces from one face of the hole or slot to the other, and reduces the risk of the material splitting at the corner.

How large should they be?

The larger the radii the stronger it will be so you will need to make an aesthetic decision on how big you can go. On the Vambit the radii was tiny, at just 0.26mm, and it was enough to make a noticeable difference. We suggest aiming for 0.5mm and greater if your design will allow it.

Where to place the nodes

Another trick to keep in mind is putting the nodes on a part of the design where you can guarantee the length. That way you don’t need to bet on the thickness changing and the range of variation is a lot smaller. This occurs when you have 2 edges that are cut by the laser that are the friction edges. This works if you are using tabs but is not necessarily the case if you are using a slotting joint.

For example, in the design of this spinning top Dan put the nodes on the tab as opposed to on the slot.

The tabs on the triangle parts fit into the slots on the circle part. Dimension X and Y will be the same each time as cut by the laser, therefore he put the nodes on these parts. Had the nodes been positioned on the slot for the handle (as in diagram below), the friction points would be against the surface of the material, a part that can vary if the thickness varies.

Other types of connections

An alternative joint is the t-slot joint which is popular with people who make more engineering-type products. This joint uses tabs to locate pieces then a t-shaped slot with a captive nut. This type of joint is great. You can slightly oversize the holes to allow for oversized material and the bolt will hold it snug together. If you use the radii on the corners of the cut outs you greatly reduce the risk of cracking the acrylic by over tightening the bolt.

If you want to go another step, rubber washers can also reduce the chance of over tightening and maintain tension in the bolt so it won’t come undone through vibrations etc.

Hopefully these tips will help you with your next laser cutting project, or perhaps give you the extra tools you need to finalize a design you’re working on.

We’ll be interested to hear your experiences using radii too, and any other advice you might have for people wanting to make 3D designs using acrylic. Let us know below!

This handy advice from Dan Emery was sourced from the Ponoko Support Forums.

Laser Cutting Nostalgia

Laser cut Bugs, snails, moons, gems, and 3D cubes!

I’m Sam Tanis and this was The Laser Cutter Roundup #260.  For the past 6 years I have been collecting my post into the weekly roundup here at Ponoko’s Blog, but The Laser Cutter Blog is coming to an end. I have been posting there since 2009 (1813 total posts!), and it is time to move on. In the near future I hope to return to blogging for Ponoko, focusing more in-depth on the skills required to make an idea into a final product. The Laser Cutter blog will remain, but it will no long be updated, except for new link that may come up. The Facebook Page will remain, and a new Facebook Group has been set up for anyone who wishes to join. Thanks Everyone!

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Above are models of VW Campervans. They are made of laser cut and etched birch plywood, like Ponoko.com‘s own Birch Plywood, and come from Fleurs Gifts.

After the jump, snails, moons, gems, and 3D cubes… (more…)

Laser Cutting On Display

Laser cut hands, pins, girls, bananas, and bow ties!

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Above is a POS display for a Samsung Camera. It is laser cut from acrylic like Ponoko.com‘s own Glass Green,  with an application of mirrored foil and comes from Milos Paripovic.

After the jump, pins, girls, bananas, and bow ties… (more…)

Laser Cut Geometry

Laser cut coasters, sleeves, flowers, and a cyclops!

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Above are a set of four geometric coasters. They are laser cut and etched into 1/8″ thick Baltic birch, like Ponoko.com‘s own  Birch Plywood, and come from Pixels and Timber.

After the jump, sleeves, flowers, and a cyclops… (more…)

Laser Cutting Comes Natural, To Some…

Laser cut camping, birds, rabbits, and sexy lady legs!

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Above is camping themed brooch set. It is painted laser cut and etched wood, like Ponoko.com‘s own Birch Plywood, and comes from The Twenty Fingers.

After the jump, birds, rabbits, and sexy lady legs… (more…)