Laser cut teeth

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #222

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is Tiny Hands on a Roll’s laser cut Shark and Fish pin. We have featured the great work from humble elephant before – not they have a Kickstarter for their amazing rolling pins.

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After the jump, pipes, crochet, cacti, and gems… (more…)

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Laser cut replica Wolcott mirror camera

Creating a miniature replica of pioneering photographic technology

With cameras at our fingertips at almost every waking moment, taking a quick selfie or a snapping a portrait of your nearest and dearest (yes, cats count too!) is something most of us do every day. For photographer Guy J. Brown, the passion for portraiture goes a little deeper; in fact, he specialises in recreating pioneering photographic techniques and devices.

One such device is the Wolcott Camera, said to be the first ever patented back in 1840. Guy has utilised the technology of his 21st century workshop to bring this early portrait machine back to life. The result is something to behold… with laser cut ply components designed in Adobe Illustrator, and hardware purchased from eBay completing the ‘baby Wolcott’.

Follow through to the source link to find out more about this project, including a deeper look at the original Wolcott camera. You can also download files to construct your own nostalgic photographic device – and then show those Instagram filters how it’s really done.

Are you a laser-equipped retro shutterbug too? Tell us about your laser cut camera experience in the comments below.

via Guy J Brown – Laser Cut Wolcott Camera

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Laser cut smoke

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #219

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut zebra wood vaporizer box from Michael’s Handmade.

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After the jump, circuits and charging stations… (more…)

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Ponoko Customer Blasts Past Kickstarter Goal in 3 hours

Another Kickstarter success using Ponoko

UPDATE: The Electric Eel Wheel has now raised over $40,928! Huge congrats to Maurice & Emily on reaching over 800% of their goal!

Maurice Ribble is the Boston based engineer behind the Electric Eel Wheel – a clever electric spinning wheel that makes it easy to spin the fiber of your choice into yarn.

Maurice’s Kickstarter campaign blew past it’s $5,000 goal in just three hours – and is on track to break $20,000 in under a week.

The Electric Eel Wheel was already a huge hit in the hobby fiber, spinning, and knitting communities, so it made sense to make the jump to Kickstarter. “I figured this would be a good project for it because nothing like it has been done before” Maurice says, ”my wife who’s been helping with this project really liked the idea of doing a Kickstarter so that’s what really decided it for me.”

Traditionally, yarn is spun with a foot powered spinning wheel – a time consuming process that tends to be hard to master. While there are electric alternatives available, quality wheels are costly- with price tags of $800 or more. This gap in the market was part of the inspiration for the Electric Eel Wheel.

Using laser cut parts from Ponoko, Maurice and his wife Emily set out to create their own electric spinning wheel that was affordable, while still being as good or better than the ones currently on the market.

Maurice says using Ponoko made it easy to reduce costs by iterating through different designs. “I was surprised at how much spending some time optimizing the part layout cut my costs.” he says  ”For me it almost cut my costs by half because I was able to share a lot of edges and use the materials more efficiently.”

While this is the fourth commercially available version of the wheel, Maurice was still able to find ways to improve the design and add new innovative features:

“Once I get my hand on the laser cut Ponoko pieces I assemble it and I almost always get ideas on how I might improve it during assembly. When those improvements are getting small I know I’m at the stage where it’s good enough.”

Maurice credits the research he did, as well as the feedback he got early on as the key to Electric Eel Wheel’s explosive success. “I read a lot about how to launch a Kickstarter campaign. Making a good video is important so I spent a lot of time on that.” Maurice says, “I shared it with a few close friends to build my confidence and get feedback on what I might tweak.”

When we asked Maurice what advice he would give to people just starting out with Kickstarter, he warned entrepreneurs-to-be not to let expansion or addition of new features hurt your project:

“Don’t let feature creep hurt your project. First you need to decide when it’s good enough to put on Kickstarter. Some of the ideas that come in are good and I do leave my options open, but you need to always consider pros and cons before adding something.”

Want to get your hands on your own Electric Eel wheel and start spinning your own yarn? The Electric Eel Wheel is available through Kickstarter at a discounted price, with packages ranging from $149-$209.

Got a great hardware idea of your own? Make and sell it with Ponoko.

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Laser cut voids

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #218

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut leather top from Julio Alejandro Rodriguez Pozos.

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After the jump, lace, leaf, cipher, and tape… (more…)

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Laser cut girls, girls, girls

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #216

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut and etched cherry wood embroidery floss holders from Pie For Blackbirds.

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After the jump, clocks, lamps, girls, and lips… (more…)

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Laser cut Asia

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #209

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut birch veneer pendant lamp from Fabripod.

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After the jump, Buddha, Chinese Newyear, and coSine… (more…)

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Laser cut Geneva Drive mechanism

Designing the gears to fit inside a laser cut Automata

The mechanical marvels that are the specialty of Rob Ives don’t just come together overnight. It takes a lot of careful planning and prototyping to get those gears working just right.

In this recent blog post, he reveals the mechanism that will be at the heart of an upcoming Automata. This arrangement of gears is called a Geneva Drive, and it was originally used as a safeguard to prevent clock springs from being over-wound.

“…a particularly interesting mechanism. There is a little window in the background of the model. Through the window you can see a portrait of a woman. As the mechanism runs I need the picture in the window to change to another portrait, then another, then another… and so on. I need the picture to be stay still for a set amount of time then flip quickly to the next picture as the mechanism runs.”

Rob designed the parts in Illustrator before laser cutting his prototypes. It will be exciting to see the final outcome, where these gears will work their mechanical magic.

You can learn more about the Geneva Drive in an earlier blog post from Rob, which features an animation of the gears in action. We often see Ponoko users creating laser cut gears from acrylic, card and wood. Perhaps this adaptation of the Geneva Drive will get your mind turning as well!

via Rob Ives: Notes

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Rope-O’Matic Kickstarter closing soon

Last chance to get your hands on a laser cut rope braiding machine

When we first came across an earlier version of this laser cut mechanical marvel, it had our heads in quite a spin. The 21st century makeover of an 1890’s industrial artefact is a fantastic example of how laser cutting can enable accessibility to broader technological possibilities.

Ever true to his word, David from Mixed Media Engineering has refined the design and launched a Kickstarter campaign for what is now known as the Rope-O’Matic.

With a diverse range of applications it is hardly surprising that this very unique laser cut product has eclipsed its modest campaign funding goal.

Check it out before you miss your chance… don’t tie yourself in knots, there are only a few days left to secure yourself one of these novel devices.

Rope-O’Matic via Kickstarter

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Laser cutting looking at you

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #202

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut and etched birch work from Adam Rosenberg.

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After the jump, space ships, gorilla’s, shells, hangers… (more…)

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