Laser cut girls, girls, girls

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #216

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut and etched cherry wood embroidery floss holders from Pie For Blackbirds.

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After the jump, clocks, lamps, girls, and lips… (more…)

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Inside laser cut animals

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #215

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut corrugated cardboard bear from Cardboard Safari.

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After the jump, sharks, cuffs, clips, and a crop… (more…)

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The Ins and Outs of Laser Cut Holes

How to get your design right for attachments to laser cut jewellery

from the Ponoko Showroom – left: madebydan, right: SuperVery

One of the most popular applications of the Ponoko Personal Factory is to make custom jewellery. This post covers advice on how to optimise your design for attachments that enable laser cut jewellery to actually be worn by someone.

Making jewellery is an excellent way to get a feel for laser cutting and try out a range of materials. Popular rigid materials include plywood, acrylic, veneer mdf, bamboo, metals; while leather and felt are commonly used soft materials.

Much of the jewellery is based on 2D shapes, so minimal prototyping is required to get the optimum result in final product. However, there are still a few problems that jewellery makers run into. Many of those are the result of not considering how other components or findings, such as jump rings, clasps, pins, etc will be attached. The other contributing factor is material durability. You have to use enough material to avoid breakage.


left: chromatophobic, right: taprobane

If you are wanting to attach a chain to your jewellery, you need to cut a hole somewhere in the shape for the jump ring that will hold the chain. But where should the hole be placed, and how big does it need to be? These details are determined by the combination of material thickness and overall design. Your design and material choice dictate the size of hole and size of jump ring to be used.

You need to leave enough material around the hole for it not to break, so it’s worthwhile checking Test Cuts photos in each of the Ponoko materials to get an idea of how finely you can cut the material. However, if the hole is too far inside the design it will not only compromise the aesthetic, but get in the way of the jump ring.

Material thickness Recommended hole diameter Recommended jump ring size
3.0mm / 0.118in 2mm / 0.079in 5mm / 0.197in
4.0mm / 0.157in 2.5mm / 0.098in 7mm / 0.280in
5.0mm / 0.197in 2.5mm / 0.098in 9mm / 0.354in
7.0mm / 0.280in 3mm / 0.118in 11mm / 0.433in

If you’re unsure whether your hole placement is functional, you can quickly draw a 1:1 cross-section of your material with different size holes and position your jump ring over the image to check the fit. The diagram below is an example.

Note how in this example, you can see that this figure illustrates how a 2mm hole in a 7mm thick material is too narrow for a jump ring to fit through.

Sometimes a circular hole just doesn’t work with the design, but don’t let it stop you. Instead, you can make the hole follow the contours of the design, which is more considered, or better yet, make it an integral design feature.


chromatophobic, Anna Corpron

This content originally appeared in a post on the Ponoko blog by Yana Skaler.

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Laser cutting city limits

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #214

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut aluminum Frederick Spires Cityscape from Shield Co.

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After the jump, hearts, dinosaurs, and a table… (more…)

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I want to believe in Foxes

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #213

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut acrylic Mulder and Scully collar clips from Sweet and Lively.

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After the jump, more foxes, scarfs, flags, and a light… (more…)

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Look at laser cutting

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #212

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut necklace from The Fashion Bandits.

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After the jump, glasses, fruit, trees, a house, and arrows… (more…)

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How to transform an existing product

IKEA product hacking gets a facelift with some custom laser cutting

stairlight2.jpg

Mass produced commercial products can make a fantastic base for custom laser cut additions. This IKEA wall fixture hack by Josh Reuss was originally posted in the Ponoko Support forums Show & Tell section, and provides a nicely resolved example of how laser cutting can be used to transform an existing product.

There is more to this than simply cutting out a shape that slips over the manufactured fitting. Josh came up with some clever ways to create the full sized panel from several smaller components, while keeping all joints concealed and obscured by the pattern details.

Follow the link for a thorough walkthrough of the process that saw an off-the-shelf product become a unique, eye-catching designer item with surprising ease. (more…)

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Laser cut wood(s)

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #211

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut tree branches shadowboxes from Shadow Fox Design.

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After the jump, clocks, gauntlets, skulls, earrings… (more…)

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Dying to laser cut

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #210

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut wood Starman coasters from Pixelaser.

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After the jump, dye, lighting, clocks, and a bracelet… (more…)

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Laser etched Moiré pattern artwork

Introducing a novel way to create tone and depth for laser etched images

Always on the lookout for new and creative ways to explore laser cutting, Martin Raynsford recently transposed an intricate graphic work into this striking laser etched art piece.

The inspiration came from Andrea Minini’s Animals in Moiré series, where the mesmerising concentric lines form styalized creatures full of character.

I manually traced the original image to create the vector artwork, each line is just a single low power cut.

Martin suggest that at some point he would like to see an app or plug-in that can generate patterns like this automatically. He has good reason to dream of an optimised workflow for future projects, given that it took 8 hours of drawing to recreate the 100+ individual lines in Andrea’s Puma portrait.

via Moiré Pattern Artwork: Puma

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