Laser cut junk

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #220

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut card from Bielyse.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, half a man, and to flamingos… (more…)

Related posts:

Laser cut smoke

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #219

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut zebra wood vaporizer box from Michael’s Handmade.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, circuits and charging stations… (more…)

Related posts:

Ponoko Customer Blasts Past Kickstarter Goal in 3 hours

Another Kickstarter success using Ponoko

UPDATE: The Electric Eel Wheel has now raised over $40,928! Huge congrats to Maurice & Emily on reaching over 800% of their goal!

Maurice Ribble is the Boston based engineer behind the Electric Eel Wheel – a clever electric spinning wheel that makes it easy to spin the fiber of your choice into yarn.

Maurice’s Kickstarter campaign blew past it’s $5,000 goal in just three hours – and is on track to break $20,000 in under a week.

The Electric Eel Wheel was already a huge hit in the hobby fiber, spinning, and knitting communities, so it made sense to make the jump to Kickstarter. “I figured this would be a good project for it because nothing like it has been done before” Maurice says, ”my wife who’s been helping with this project really liked the idea of doing a Kickstarter so that’s what really decided it for me.”

Traditionally, yarn is spun with a foot powered spinning wheel – a time consuming process that tends to be hard to master. While there are electric alternatives available, quality wheels are costly- with price tags of $800 or more. This gap in the market was part of the inspiration for the Electric Eel Wheel.

Using laser cut parts from Ponoko, Maurice and his wife Emily set out to create their own electric spinning wheel that was affordable, while still being as good or better than the ones currently on the market.

Maurice says using Ponoko made it easy to reduce costs by iterating through different designs. “I was surprised at how much spending some time optimizing the part layout cut my costs.” he says  ”For me it almost cut my costs by half because I was able to share a lot of edges and use the materials more efficiently.”

While this is the fourth commercially available version of the wheel, Maurice was still able to find ways to improve the design and add new innovative features:

“Once I get my hand on the laser cut Ponoko pieces I assemble it and I almost always get ideas on how I might improve it during assembly. When those improvements are getting small I know I’m at the stage where it’s good enough.”

Maurice credits the research he did, as well as the feedback he got early on as the key to Electric Eel Wheel’s explosive success. “I read a lot about how to launch a Kickstarter campaign. Making a good video is important so I spent a lot of time on that.” Maurice says, “I shared it with a few close friends to build my confidence and get feedback on what I might tweak.”

When we asked Maurice what advice he would give to people just starting out with Kickstarter, he warned entrepreneurs-to-be not to let expansion or addition of new features hurt your project:

“Don’t let feature creep hurt your project. First you need to decide when it’s good enough to put on Kickstarter. Some of the ideas that come in are good and I do leave my options open, but you need to always consider pros and cons before adding something.”

Want to get your hands on your own Electric Eel wheel and start spinning your own yarn? The Electric Eel Wheel is available through Kickstarter at a discounted price, with packages ranging from $149-$209.

Got a great hardware idea of your own? Make and sell it with Ponoko.

Related posts:

Laser cut voids

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #218

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut leather top from Julio Alejandro Rodriguez Pozos.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, lace, leaf, cipher, and tape… (more…)

Related posts:

Laser cut Pi(e) fillings

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #217

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut birch Bel-Aire enclosure for Raspberry Pi from The C4 Labs.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, lions, birds, and brass… (more…)

Related posts:

Laser cut girls, girls, girls

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #216

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut and etched cherry wood embroidery floss holders from Pie For Blackbirds.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, clocks, lamps, girls, and lips… (more…)

Related posts:

Inside laser cut animals

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #215

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above is a laser cut corrugated cardboard bear from Cardboard Safari.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, sharks, cuffs, clips, and a crop… (more…)

Related posts:

The Ins and Outs of Laser Cut Holes

How to get your design right for attachments to laser cut jewellery

from the Ponoko Showroom – left: madebydan, right: SuperVery

One of the most popular applications of the Ponoko Personal Factory is to make custom jewellery. This post covers advice on how to optimise your design for attachments that enable laser cut jewellery to actually be worn by someone.

Making jewellery is an excellent way to get a feel for laser cutting and try out a range of materials. Popular rigid materials include plywood, acrylic, veneer mdf, bamboo, metals; while leather and felt are commonly used soft materials.

Much of the jewellery is based on 2D shapes, so minimal prototyping is required to get the optimum result in final product. However, there are still a few problems that jewellery makers run into. Many of those are the result of not considering how other components or findings, such as jump rings, clasps, pins, etc will be attached. The other contributing factor is material durability. You have to use enough material to avoid breakage.


left: chromatophobic, right: taprobane

If you are wanting to attach a chain to your jewellery, you need to cut a hole somewhere in the shape for the jump ring that will hold the chain. But where should the hole be placed, and how big does it need to be? These details are determined by the combination of material thickness and overall design. Your design and material choice dictate the size of hole and size of jump ring to be used.

You need to leave enough material around the hole for it not to break, so it’s worthwhile checking Test Cuts photos in each of the Ponoko materials to get an idea of how finely you can cut the material. However, if the hole is too far inside the design it will not only compromise the aesthetic, but get in the way of the jump ring.

Material thickness Recommended hole diameter Recommended jump ring size
3.0mm / 0.118in 2mm / 0.079in 5mm / 0.197in
4.0mm / 0.157in 2.5mm / 0.098in 7mm / 0.280in
5.0mm / 0.197in 2.5mm / 0.098in 9mm / 0.354in
7.0mm / 0.280in 3mm / 0.118in 11mm / 0.433in

If you’re unsure whether your hole placement is functional, you can quickly draw a 1:1 cross-section of your material with different size holes and position your jump ring over the image to check the fit. The diagram below is an example.

Note how in this example, you can see that this figure illustrates how a 2mm hole in a 7mm thick material is too narrow for a jump ring to fit through.

Sometimes a circular hole just doesn’t work with the design, but don’t let it stop you. Instead, you can make the hole follow the contours of the design, which is more considered, or better yet, make it an integral design feature.


chromatophobic, Anna Corpron

This content originally appeared in a post on the Ponoko blog by Yana Skaler.

Related posts:

Laser cutting city limits

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #214

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut aluminum Frederick Spires Cityscape from Shield Co.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, hearts, dinosaurs, and a table… (more…)

Related posts:

I want to believe in Foxes

The Laser Cutter Roundup — a weekly dose of laser-cut love: #213

Hey, Sam here collecting the post from The Laser Cutter.

Above are laser cut acrylic Mulder and Scully collar clips from Sweet and Lively.

Make sure you join TLC’s Facebook page.

After the jump, more foxes, scarfs, flags, and a light… (more…)

Related posts: