Designing a cheap, open source, powder-based 3D printer

Introducing the AdderFab.

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The cowboys of 3D printing over at Open3DP recently released information about their project to design a powder-based personal 3D printer. Three different groups of students doing Capstone projects over the past four years have worked on this project, improving the printer each time.

For the most recent version they aimed for a printer that would cost less than $300, be completely open source, and use inkjet technology. What makes this printer particularly special is the use of powder instead of heated filament, a first for low cost printers. Using powder allows objects with large undercuts and empty space to be printed at a high resolution.

Unfortunately, the AdderFab is not yet available to the public, but they have already assembled a new team to turn the prototype into a product. Read more about the project and watch for new developments on the Open3DP blog.

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One Response to “Designing a cheap, open source, powder-based 3D printer”

  1. Colin Keizer Says:

    Looking forward to seeing the complete plans when they become available to the public.

    I’ve built a CNC router and am learning G-code. Will soon have a Thing-O-Matic kit for additive printing. Would love to build a powder printer to try pottery printing, wood flour printing and other fun ideas.