Desktop Factories in Every Classroom, Business and Home

desktop Factory 2
When the The Apple LaserWriter first hit the mass market in 1985, the desktop publishing revolution was born. With a starting price of $6995 the unit weighed a hefty 77 lb (35kg) and was 11.5 x 18.5 x 16.2 inches the first desktop printer was not the lightweight, disposable peripheral printers have become today, in every classroom, business and home.
laserwriter
23 years later and Desktop Factory, (previously mentioned on Ponoko Blog) are about to launch us into the 3rd dimension of desktop printing with their 125ci 3D Printer for under U$5000. The unit weighing around 90 lb (40kg) and 25 x 20 x 20 is only marginally bigger than the first Apple LaserWriter, and allowing for inflation, considerably cheaper.
desktop Factory
Desktop Factory CEO Cathy Lewis will be one of the speakers at the First Annual MIT Smart Customization Seminar to be held on November 10th at the MIT Sloan School of Management, Cambridge, MA.
cathy
Cathy has been generous enough to grant us an interview to discuss her views on the future of 3D printing and her part in bringing 3D printing to every classroom, business and home.

Stay Tuned

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18 Responses to “Desktop Factories in Every Classroom, Business and Home”

  1. 3D Printers Now as Cheap As Laser Printers Were | The Green House Effect Says:

    [...] Share. Learn. Shop. Explore. We do go on about the possibilities of downloadable designs, where you can pick the best from around the world and get it printed up at some form of 3D Kinko that might some day be in every neighbourhood. Perhaps that vision isn’t wild enough; the Ponoko blog notes that the desktop publishing revolution was born when the Apple LaserWriter was released in 1985 for $6995. Now Desktop Factory is launching a 3D printer that isn’t much bigger than that laser printer, and at $5,000 i… [...]

  2. 3D Printers Now as Cheap As Laser Printers Were in 1985 | Eco Friendly Mag Says:

    [...] Perhaps that vision isn’t wild enough; the Ponoko blog notes that the desktop publishing revolution was born when the Apple LaserWriter was released in 1985 for $6995. Now Desktop Factory is launching a 3D printer that isn’t much bigger than that laser printer, and at $5,000 i… Source: TreeHugger Bookmark It Hide Sites [...]

  3. SuperJdynamite Says:

    So it’s going to be 23 years before I can afford a 3D printer? That’s depressing.

  4. Bogdan Bivolaru Says:

    There is already a similar machine, priced at 400$. See http://reprap.org/
    Yes, it does not look so pretty, but it can duplicate its own parts easily. In the end it depends on what you really want, but I’d rather buy the 400$ machine.

  5. Asus and Intel jump on to social production bandwagon Says:

    [...] When are really usable, easily distributable tools going to be available for the masses to truly start designing, rather than just talking about their design?  I know we do some things that are approaching this, and there are some other efforts from our competitors, but none of them seem to quite hit the nail on the head.  What’s seems strange to me is that the production side is getting closer to support the crowd that the design part, what with 3D printers as cheap as laser printers when they first came out.  This seems backwards to me since the social production model that will work will be based on manufacturers working with the crowd to pick the best design or design elements, not 1,000’s of individuals pumping out products on their desktop and flooding the market with choices that ultimately will make the buyers less satisfied. [...]

  6. Jeremy Says:

    This is cool – but when everyone can print their work in the school lab or in their garage, how will Ponoko make money?

  7. 3D Printers Now as Cheap As Laser Printers Were in 1985 | Only Hybrids Says:

    [...] Perhaps that vision isn’t wild enough; the Ponoko blog notes that the desktop publishing revolution was born when the Apple LaserWriter was released in 1985 for 95. Now Desktop Factory is launching a 3D printer that isn’t much bigger than that laser printer, and at ,000 i… [...]

  8. Ponoko Blog Says:

    [...] In a previous post we introduced Desktop Factory, and the fact that their 3D printer will be less expensive then the first desktop 2D printer when it was released. We also mentioned Cathy Lewis, CEO of Desktop Factory who will be presenting at the First Annual MIT Smart Customization Seminar to be held on November 10th. For those of you who are not able to attend Cathy has been generous with her time to answer a few questions Just to get a little background, before becoming part of the Desktop Factory you were General Manager at Siemens Information Systems and Vice President/General Manager, Xerox Corporation, what brought you to be involved with desktop factory, 3d printing and personal fabrication? [...]

  9. Ted Hall Says:

    ‘Subtractive’ 3D printing is here and also cool and also affordable (e.g. ShopBot, http://www.shopbottools.com). A subtractive 3D printer (also called a CNC tool) can make things as small as a circuit board or as large as a house. It will fabricate the item from realistic materials such as wood, plastic, aluminum, foam, and many other materials. And will do it relatively quickly compared to ‘additive’ 3D printing. It will machine, carve, or sculpt from STL files or cut parts from virtually any vector file format. It is the type of tool that puts real manufacturing capabilities in the hands of individuals or garage shops and makes custom fabrication a possibility for any DIYer.

  10. Ian Foote Says:

    Don’t buy this. This business initiative is about closing off access.

    Go buy a RepRap.

    You can get the parts you would ordinarially manufacture with a RepRap from here:

    http://bitsfrombytes.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=shop.flypage&product_id=92&category_id=5&manufacturer_id=0&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=1

    And you can get the non-fabricatable parts here in a kit:

    http://store.rrrf.org/product_info.php?cPath=1&products_id=78

    Then, you can use your RepRap to make another RepRap for when the first one breaks down, then make a few for your friends, so they can make them for their friends.

    Incidentally, they work with polylactic acid, a plastic which is biodegradable and sourced from corn. Which leaves open the possibility that you can create your own raw materials or buy them from a local cottage industry.

    Don’t buy this. Support a similar effort that actually cares to empower you, rather than just sell to you. Build a RepRap.

  11. plus six » links for 2008-11-02 Says:

    [...] Desktop Factories in Every Classroom, Business and Home – Ponoko Blog "Desktop Factory [...] are about to launch us into the 3rd dimension of desktop printing with their 125ci 3D Printer for under U$5000. The unit weighing around 90 lb (40kg) and 25 x 20 x 20 is only marginally bigger than the first Apple LaserWriter, and allowing for inflation, considerably cheaper." (tags: technology printing rapidprototyping future 3d fabrication fablab) [...]

  12. D’log :: blogging since 2000 » Alan Moore’s brain Says:

    [...] Alan Moore’s brain; hmm, definitely a candidate for the first 3D object to ‘print’ with my first home-desktop 3D printer. [...]

  13. Brandsential » Blog Archive » Print3D- How will you use it? Says:

    [...] There is a great post on the Ponoko blog, that talks about a disruptive shift in the way consumers will represent everything from maps to parts. Its called 3D printing and could be as important a change in the way we think about form as the shift from dot-matrix printers (remember those?) to laser printers. [...]

  14. Ponoko Blog Says:

    [...] We are all looking for ways to reduce our carbon footprint, what with hybrid cars, recycled toilet paper and e-mailed then laser sintered souvenirs to friends back home when on international holidays. With Christmas fast approaching, let’s not send gifts that have been designed in America, manufactured in China with materials from Australia, shipped back to New Zealand and then sent sent to Europe? Let’s reduce the global traffic and use local manufacturers to produce a ‘local’ product. As previously mentioned on the Ponoko Blog Spanish designer Hector Serrano has developed the Reduced Carbon Footprint Souvenirs so you can email your friends back home personalized souvenirs which they then materialize using a 3D Printer (stereolithography rapid prototyping). No transport or standard production methods are required so the object carbon footprint is reduced to the minimum. The project questions the way objects are manufactured and new technologies are applied to propose alternatives ways of reducing their impact on the environment. The project becomes specially relevant as the 3D printers are getting smaller and more affordable. For more from Hector check out his site, or the great interview on the Core77 Podcast. [...]

  15. Rhizome | Means of Production: Fabbing and Digital Art « Graphic Design from the beach Says:

    [...] Image: Zaha Hadid & Parrish | Rash, Kartal Pendik Masterplan Installation, 2008. (photo: Bettina Johae)Several years ago, while making the lecture circuit rounds, American architect William Massie described a key goal within his practice as moving towards a more direct translation between bits and atoms. Architecture has always thrived on the tension between representation and material assemblages and what he was addressing with this comment was the dawning of an era characterized by a new proximity between digital models and physical output. In selected contexts, artists, architects, and designers have been exploring these accelerated development cycles for a decade but the involved technologies are descending in price so quickly that, for example, 3D printers are now cheaper than laser printers were in 1985. A key question: how does the looming ubiquity of these tools and workflows apply to the production and display of new media art? This article will explore digital fabrication (aka fabbing) at a variety of scales which include the curatorial questions raised by these new hybrid industrial design/sculpture objects as well as the implications on the practice of individual artists. Before delving into either of these milieus it would be useful to acknowledge some common language and terminology associated with fabrication and recognize some important precedents. [...]

  16. Props» The Future of Making Props Says:

    [...] to the blog at Ponoko, the Desktop Factory is similar in price to the first consumer laser printer which was released in [...]

  17. Ponoko Blog Says:

    [...] out Desktop Factory which could not otherwise raise the funds needed to continue developing a commercial 3D printer for under $5k. While they have committed to complete the development of this breakthrough technology they will [...]

  18. The Edge » Say Hello to Digital Creation. Oh, and Jaymis. And 3D Printers. Says:

    [...] year ago, Ponoko (a 3D fabrication company based around laser cutting and assembly of flat objects) announced that 3D printers now cost the same as Laser printers did 20ish years ago. In the intervening year it doesn’t seem that an actual [...]